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sycasey 2.0

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sycasey 2.0 last won the day on December 30 2018

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About sycasey 2.0

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  • Birthday 08/18/1980

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  1. sycasey 2.0

    The Last Picture Show

    Exactly. He's the "observer" character, and by nature a passive person. That's why he's still in town at the end. I remember also being "not impressed" by this movie the first time I watched it (must have been in my early 20s?), but this time it played much better. Maybe it was more about knowing what to expect: there's no central plot and no major incident, and that's the point. It's giving us a true "slice of life" in a dull, decaying small town. This time I was able to take that as a given and see how Bogdanovich used it to comment on other things, like the transition from movies to TV (he doesn't like it), or a tribute to black-and-white cinema, or how one generation of kids interacts with the prior generation of parents. On that last point, it's interesting how Bogdanovich doesn't portray his "coming of age" as a pure rejection of the past, like plenty of other filmmakers were doing at the time (compare this to Bonnie and Clyde or Easy Rider or The Graduate) -- it's more elegiac about things that were lost while also acknowledging that the past can't continue. Given that, it's not surprising to hear Bogdanovich in his interview still pining for the great stars of the past.
  2. sycasey 2.0

    The Last Picture Show

    I'm not sure the movie really has a "main character" . . . the town is the main character. Sonny is just the one who observes the most stuff. Anyway, that Simpsons reference is too recent for me to find any shareable clips of it, but nice to know they've now done one!
  3. sycasey 2.0

    Unforgiven

    It's actually a very well-moderated Facebook group . . . which tells you just how hard it is to moderate on Facebook.
  4. sycasey 2.0

    Unforgiven

    The thing that is baffling me is that in this week's podcast she even said she probably hasn't been using the right word and explained herself . . . yet we keep seeing these threads.
  5. sycasey 2.0

    Unforgiven

    Honestly, I think MOST of that group is in your corner here . . . but the thing about Facebook is that it's hard to stop anyone from just starting up their own new topic, even if it's about something that's already been talked to death.
  6. sycasey 2.0

    Unforgiven

    I find that this has been the case with other Eastwood-directed stuff too. For example, with Million Dollar Baby there were a lot of people who saw the ending and took it as a "pro-euthanasia" movie and all that that entails. I didn't see it that way; I saw it as a movie about a boxer and a coach who become a surrogate father-daughter pair, and have their love for each other challenged in the most difficult way possible, a way that had no "good" answer. That was the point: the morals were too murky to easily judge his actions. Eastwood seems to want his movies to live in that unsettled, in-between space. Sometimes that results in a movie that feels too weightless and "about nothing" (Changeling would be one of my go-to examples of this), but this is where I think some of the obvious and on-the-nose metaphors in the Unforgiven script are helped by Eastwood presenting them in such a flat and unfussy way (IMO, an unsubtle writer like Paul Haggis was also helped by having the Eastwood approach laid on top of his script). He just lets it all sit out there, so you can make of it what you will. I guess you can also wonder about how much of this is intentional (it could just be laziness), but I see the approach repeated a lot in Eastwood's work so I think it probably is intentional.
  7. sycasey 2.0

    Unforgiven

    Oscar wins do seem to give films a leg up in making it onto the list. The AFI's guidelines even specifically mention that awards recognition should be a major criterion for voters, so I suspect that's a big part of it. So Unforgiven probably makes it because it's a way to get Clint Eastwood on there and it's his most-awarded work. Also, welcome back to the forums, Pomatto!
  8. sycasey 2.0

    Unforgiven

    Yup, and the fact of the Schofield Kid desperately wanting to be such a gunslinger while also being literally myopic.
  9. sycasey 2.0

    Unforgiven

    I very much disagree with Amy's take that the movie is aggrandizing Will as a character. To me the tone of the scenes she referenced (the conversation with the prostitute and the final shootout) is far darker than that. It seems to me that the whole arc of his character is that he was never really devoted to being a non-violent family man. That's why he can't properly ride a horse or handle a gun when he's playing that role. He can't enjoy sex, so he refuses the offer (meanwhile his buddy Ned has no problem enjoying himself). It's only when Will fully commits to being the killer that he's able to take down Little Bill's whole posse (and it's no coincidence that this only happens after Ned has been killed). To me that's not aggrandizement, that's an examination of the dark heart of the classic Western. The camera putting you in Will's POV in that final scene is a challenge, not a ploy for sympathy.
  10. sycasey 2.0

    Unforgiven

    No Simpsons references to this specific movie, but some great Eastwood parodies: "It means he gets results, you STUPID CHIEF!!"
  11. sycasey 2.0

    The Searchers

    Hmm, interesting. Exactly the opposite for me. It keeps improving.
  12. sycasey 2.0

    Top Films of 2018

    It does bother me, in that moving actual Lead performances to Supporting categories means that spots are taken away from actors doing great work in less-visible roles, and those are often actors who can't command top money or get their pick of scripts -- i.e. exactly the kinds of actors the Supporting categories were created to honor in the first place. It's especially egregious when there's a big star like Emma Stone appearing in nearly every scene of The Favourite and somehow being categorized as "Supporting Actress." Nonsense.
  13. sycasey 2.0

    Top Films of 2018

    I didn't think Malek was bad, but otherwise yeah pretty much. I think that (very good) Live Aid bit coming right at the end leaves people thinking they actually saw a great movie. No, you just saw a great final scene.
  14. sycasey 2.0

    Top Films of 2018

    Well, the Golden Globes have spoken. Best movies are Green Book and Bohemian Rhapsody, shut it down.
  15. sycasey 2.0

    The Searchers

    I've had scenarios where I didn't quite "get" a movie on first glance, but after doing a bit of reading on it and then going back it totally clicked. Mulholland Dr. was one like that for me. It also wasn't that I really had to "work" to get the movie to click the next time; I just went into it looking for different things and it became a different emotional experience. Sometimes it helps to find that key.
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