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sycasey 2.0

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sycasey 2.0 last won the day on March 21

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About sycasey 2.0

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  • Birthday 08/18/1980

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  1. sycasey 2.0

    West Side Story

    Double bill with the It's a Wonderful Life killing spree ending.
  2. sycasey 2.0

    West Side Story

    Some other thoughts: -More on the racial commentary feeling amazingly advanced: the detective in the movie claims to be on the Jets' side (because they are white), but then when they won't give him what he wants he starts turning his anti-immigrant rhetoric around on them too (making fun of their Polish or Italian parents). That's really interesting and gets at some of what Ta-Nehisi Coates gets at in talking about "whiteness." How some groups were once considered "not white" (Irish, Italians, Jews) and later got to consider themselves white and started punching down at the remaining non-white (often the newest immigrants). This movie shows that progression in one character in real time. -Natalie Wood is probably the weakest actor in the movie, but I think she delivers the "feel" of the tragic lover archetype well enough. She also saves her best scenes for the end (IMO), after Tony's death. I also can't be too objective here, as I always had kind of a crush on Natalie Wood, in part because she reminds me of one of my big high school crushes (that girl was half-Russian and half-Mexican, which helped me kind of buy Wood as a Puerto Rican, though I know she was fully Russian in real life). -Michael Bay talking about this movie is a must-read. He's actually pretty insightful about what it does. https://www.nytimes.com/2001/05/18/movies/watching-movies-with-michael-bay-a-connoisseur-of-illusions.html
  3. sycasey 2.0

    West Side Story

    I'll just repost my Letterboxd comments to get the discussion going: I understand that the casting of the leads isn't that great and that the use of white actors in the Puerto Rican roles looks bad to modern eyes and that not every scene is perfectly exectuted, but whatever . . . as soon as one of the many brilliant dance numbers kicks into high gear it brings tears to my eyes, every time. Has group choreography ever been shot and edited this well? I was also struck this time by how relevant the themes about American race relations have remained, which suggests an evergreen quality to the material. At times, West Side Story still feels trenchant and caustic in its commentary: witness the cops treating the white hoodlums more kindly than the brown ones (though still not that kindly), the poor white folks complaining about how the immigrants are "taking over" . . . are we sure this was written 60 years ago? I guess they do also say things like "Daddy-O."
  4. sycasey 2.0

    West Side Story

    I'm also not sure if this really counts, but I've always loved this bit:
  5. I did not find this episode any louder than the usual live episode and remain baffled that the first comments are about that. As for the movie: aside from the confusing plot and character motivations, I was also constantly disoriented by how the camera just kept drifting aimlessly around the actors, even in scenes where they're just delivering exposition at each other. It was like Alfredson decided he wanted to try directing a CSI episode or something. Why is the camera always moving?!
  6. sycasey 2.0

    A Night At The Opera

    The Marx Brothers' socio-political satire I don't think is as pointed or focused as Monty Python's, but yeah, that is also a point in favor of Duck Soup.
  7. sycasey 2.0

    A Night At The Opera

    It was a close vote! I personally find Life of Brian just as funny and also better as a story, so I voted for that. But it's hard to argue that Holy Grail isn't really their most iconic work.
  8. sycasey 2.0

    Saving Private Ryan

    There's zero indication in the movie that Ryan is Jewish, and I don't think it's Spielberg's way to be circumspect about this kind of thing: he'd already made one movie that is very explicitly about the Holocaust (Schindler's List) and then later another explicit take on the contradictions of modern Judaism (Munich). Saving Private Ryan already has a character (played by Adam Goldberg) who is openly and vocally Jewish. I don't really buy that Ryan himself is some kind of stealthy stand-in for a segment of the Jewish population. With Spielberg, a cigar is usually just a cigar.
  9. sycasey 2.0

    Saving Private Ryan

    I have seen The Patriot, and you are correct sir.
  10. sycasey 2.0

    A Night At The Opera

    Same. I would also vote Airplane! on there first.
  11. sycasey 2.0

    Saving Private Ryan

    This gets tricky with foreign movies because of release dates. I think After Life and Run Lola Run were not released in the U.S. until 1999, so they would not have been in Oscar contention in 1998. (And yes, those two movies add to the argument of 1999 being the great movie year of the 90s.)
  12. sycasey 2.0

    A Night At The Opera

    Though I would say there's a big difference between people being nostalgic for something that was contemporary media in their youth and falling for something made 40-50 years before they were born. The latter tends to be more legit.
  13. sycasey 2.0

    Saving Private Ryan

    It was okay, but then 1999 was phenomenal (yet the Oscar nominations were somehow worse).
  14. sycasey 2.0

    Saving Private Ryan

    The Truman Show probably was a legit contender, given that it got three other nominations. Rushmore was too small a release at the time and Big Lebowski was considered a flop.
  15. sycasey 2.0

    A Night At The Opera

    I have a vague sense here that A Night at the Opera works better on first viewing, but Duck Soup works better after multiple viewings. The lack of story in the latter doesn't matter so much when you're not expecting it anymore, while the "dead spots" in the former become more magnified when you're waiting for the next comedy bit.
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