Jump to content

sycasey 2.0

Members
  • Content count

    1055
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    25

sycasey 2.0 last won the day on May 19

sycasey 2.0 had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

1912 Excellent

About sycasey 2.0

  • Rank
    Bling Bling
  • Birthday 08/18/1980

Recent Profile Visitors

2430 profile views
  1. sycasey 2.0

    Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

    You know the old saying: "The common denominator in all your bad relationships is you?" Maybe if you're getting posts deleted in two different forums with different moderators there is something you can change about your own behavior.
  2. sycasey 2.0

    Gone with the Wind

    I admit, I didn't think we'd get to "this is why Trump won" THIS quickly.
  3. sycasey 2.0

    Gone with the Wind

    Is that all you did, or did you also use phrases like "fuck you" in doing so? Because if so I think the latter is why you would have gotten banned. In my experience people are not kicked out of that group merely for disagreeing with the hosts.
  4. sycasey 2.0

    Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

    Sure, I don't mean to suggest this doesn't still exist. But I think the level of pressure was significantly different in the 1950s and 60s, and to me the film seemed to land its drama on that heightened assumption. Someone else also pointed out on the Facebook group: it's interesting that the two wives don't get any scenes alone together, but the husbands certainly do. That kind of frames the conversation about the couples' infertility in a specifically male way. Again, I get it, it's a 50 year old movie. These were just some things that kind of nagged at me while watching it.
  5. sycasey 2.0

    Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

    For me it's more that I get the sense the filmmakers are also assuming that you'll just get it, that this was the thing causing so much pain in these couples' lives. That's highly subjective of course, but the way it's structured, with the idea of George and Martha's infertility being saved for the final "reveal," it feels to me like that's supposed to read as an "Ohhhhhh" moment, so as to explain the couple's mean and erratic behavior for the entire film. The underlying assumption seems to be, yes, women want to have babies and will have psychological problems if they can't.
  6. sycasey 2.0

    Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

    Yes, but BOTH women in the movie have their issues tied back to infertility. It's not so much that the idea is invoked once here, it's that it's part of a long-standing and over-used trope. Also that.
  7. sycasey 2.0

    Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

    Sure. I mean, they are, clearly. It's just that to me the movie feels like it's being presented as something immediate, very forward-looking, as opposed to something like, say, Gone with the Wind, which is already meant to be portraying an antiquated time even for when it was originally made. There's a dissonance there with Woolf that threw me off.
  8. sycasey 2.0

    Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

    I voted no and will probably be alone in that. It's a well-acted and well-made production, not going to deny that. I was bothered by a couple of things: 1. It REALLY feels like a play to me. Not that Nichols doesn't do stuff with the camera to add cinematic language, he does, but it seems like all of the dialogue is basically intact from the stage show and it feels obvious. People describe things rather than do them. The movie tells more than it shows. It's not badly done, exactly, but to me I wouldn't put this up as emblematic of "cinema." The Graduate, on the other hand, is communicating a whole helluva lot just with visuals and music. We haven't gotten to it yet, but to my recollection A Streetcar Named Desire is a much better stage-to-film example. 2. Some of this is what Amy brought up: the assumptions about male/female roles are really rooted in the time. Not just that the failure to have kids will inevitably have a negative effect on women, but also the general social pressure to be married, that the younger couple felt an absolute need to marry because of a pregnancy that turned out to be false. Not sure you could put that in a movie today. I'm not really blaming the movie for that (those were the standards of the time), but as an all-time entry I found it a bit unfortunately dated.
  9. sycasey 2.0

    Gone with the Wind

    I think you make a fair point that Amy is being inconsistent in her treatment of Scarlett vs. Alex (and I guess Travis Bickle too, though she mentions that in the episode), but I will also say here that in the long run you'll probably be better off if you let go of any expectation that artistic criticism is ever going to be "objective." Everyone has their biases.
  10. sycasey 2.0

    Gone with the Wind

    Someone posted this piece to the Facebook group, by a black woman writer. I thought it was very perceptive about the film's virtues and faults. It speaks to a lot of what PureSly is getting at above. https://www.vulture.com/2017/09/gone-with-the-wind-and-cinematic-monuments-to-the-confederacy.html
  11. sycasey 2.0

    Gone with the Wind

    My feeling on this is that the movie both glorifies the old South and acknowledges the folly in thinking it could continue. It is both/and, and neither/nor. By today's standards it is unacceptably racist and white-centric. By the standards of the time it probably represented a progressive advance over stuff like Birth of a Nation or The General, in that it actually contained black characters with real speaking roles and had its leading man oppose the war effort in the first place. I can see the argument for keeping it on as a necessary historical document, and because there is a lot of greatness in it. I also think the complexity of Scarlett the character DOES represent the conflicted way this film depicts the Confederacy: kind of respecting the way she perseveres, but also showing how it leaves her unfulfilled and unhappy. She doesn't get a happy ending here. I don't think Paul quite gives the film enough credit for presenting this character as multifaceted and interesting. Re: placement, I basically agree with Paul: keep it on the list, but it's too high. The problematic stuff can't be entirely excused, though some is also standard "product of its time" stuff.
  12. sycasey 2.0

    Gone with the Wind

  13. sycasey 2.0

    Deer Hunter

    So I guess the question is, does the movie want you to think he's the hero? To me it kind of seems like it does.
  14. sycasey 2.0

    Deer Hunter

    I mean, plot-wise it makes sense that an illegal gambling house in Asia would be run by Asian gangsters. It's more that as a whole the movie definitely engages in some classic Orientalism, in a kind of unthinking way. That's not all on The Deer Hunter, as there are PLENTY of American movies before and after this one that did much the same thing.
×