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sycasey 2.0

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Everything posted by sycasey 2.0

  1. sycasey 2.0

    Episode 222 - Unforgettable

    Perhaps an omission: When Paul read the taglines for the movie, they commented on how "For Better" and "For Worse" as separate taglines was dumb. But I suspected these were for two separate posters, each featuring a different actress. And indeed it was:
  2. sycasey 2.0

    Episode 222 - Unforgettable

    In the episode they talk about why the movie was named Unforgettable, but then talk about how most of the other good titles were taken. But Unforgettable is ALSO taken! This does look like prime HDTGM material.
  3. sycasey 2.0

    Episode 222 - Unforgettable

    It needed a moment like when J-Lo stabs the guy in the eye in The Boy Next Door.
  4. sycasey 2.0

    Unspooled live show 9/26

    IMO A Hard Day's Night is a legitimately great and important film . . . but it's also totally British and probably doesn't belong on the AFI list.
  5. sycasey 2.0

    On The Waterfront

    On the question of this being an apologia for Kazan's actions during the blacklist era: certainly the ending seems that way, but when considering the movie as a whole, you also have to take into account how it begins, where Terry gets a friend killed as a result of ratting him out. Given that, I can see more nuance in the movie: it all depends on who you are ratting out to, and in Kazan's time, it might have been hard to tell who were the good guys and who weren't. For me this helps with any discomfort I might feel about the film's relationship to HUAC; it is thoughtful about the issue, not just a polemic.
  6. sycasey 2.0

    Unspooled live show 9/26

    Here's hoping they cover Ringo Starr in Caveman!
  7. sycasey 2.0

    On The Waterfront

    Amy's reach candidates for an On the Waterfront reference. I couldn't come up with a direct one either.
  8. sycasey 2.0

    Lawrence of Arabia

    Maybe, but a more generous reading would be to say that the movie is saying that humans in general are tribal like that, and that very few are able to see outside of that to a more altruistic view (as the Omar Sharif character does). It comes from the perspective of the British, of course (being a British movie about a British soldier), but I do think the filmmakers seem pretty aware and critical of the "white savior" problem inherent in the story (especially for a movie from 1962!).
  9. sycasey 2.0

    Lawrence of Arabia

    I think it really was just "people voting," not that the institute made any ruling to declare it ineligible, but I believe the oft-stated reason for The Third Man being left off the second list was that it wasn't really American. I'd argue that by the same standard, Lawrence of Arabia isn't either, probably even less so (The Third Man has an American lead character and antagonist, at least). You could get into whole discussions about this "country of origin" stuff too. Like Lord of the Rings, what is that? The source material is certainly very British, along with a lot of the supporting cast. The production itself was New Zealand-based, as were the director, screenwriters, and most of the production staff. The studio financing was all American, as was much of the principal cast (Elijah Wood, Viggo Mortensen, Sean Astin, Liv Tyler). You'd have a decent claim for all three countries.
  10. sycasey 2.0

    Lawrence of Arabia

    Oh yeah, here:
  11. sycasey 2.0

    Lawrence of Arabia

    I voted no solely because I agree with the argument that this is really a British movie, and if The Third Man could be knocked off then this one could too (if anything, that film is more "culturally" American since two of its lead actors are American). As a film unto itself it's clearly worthy of standing among the Top 100.
  12. sycasey 2.0

    Lawrence of Arabia

  13. sycasey 2.0

    Network

    The thing is that they are really only watching the BEST movies from the old days (or at least those widely considered the best). There was plenty of forgettable crap in the 50s, 60s, 70s too, it's just that . . . it's been forgotten.
  14. sycasey 2.0

    Episode 221. The Hottie and the Nottie

    Yes, Christine Lakin! And yes, she is better-looking than Paris Hilton. I actually thought her performance in this movie was very good, much better than anyone else's. Like, June's turn to start liking Nate at the end was barely motivated by the writing (if at all), but damned if she didn't try her best to sell it in that final scene. No way her efforts could have saved this movie, but I appreciate the effort.
  15. sycasey 2.0

    Network

    Yeah, it fell down a few pegs for me after this recent rewatch. I still think it's worthy of staying on the AFI 100 (seems pretty essential to see at least once), but some of the didactic writing hurts, and I don't find the Holden-Dunaway romantic subplot at all convincing. But the acting and Lumet's direction are pretty great, and of course the themes of the movie are evergreen.
  16. sycasey 2.0

    Network

  17. sycasey 2.0

    Network

    Honestly, I think that is more Paddy Chayefsky's fault than the actors. Sometimes he can't resist making the subtext text.
  18. sycasey 2.0

    The Philadelphia Story

    Right, and Jimmy Stewart is great as always. But he's also on the list many times, generally for performances I find better than this one. Not sure I need this movie on the list, enjoyable as it is.
  19. sycasey 2.0

    The Philadelphia Story

    The trouble I have with this movie is that I feel like all of its merits are exactly what you would get out of it as a play, the dialogue and the plot and the acting. I'm not sure I see where it's doing anything special as a piece of cinema. I had similar issues with Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? , but even there I think Mike Nichols does more with the camera than George Cukor does here. For a list of "greatest movies," what exactly are we honoring with this one? I don't think it's bad or anything, but is it really one of the foremost examples of what The Movies can do? On Amy's old podcast The Canon, they did a versus episode between The Philadelphia Story and His Girl Friday. His Girl Friday won. I think that was the right choice; that movie takes similar themes and puts them into (IMO) a more cinematic package that doesn't just look like a filmed play. I think it works better as a treatment of those themes too, not pulling its punches as much with a cynical take on romance in 1930s/40s America.
  20. sycasey 2.0

    The Philadelphia Story

  21. I'm gonna say it's almost certainly American Samoa, given that The Rock's grandfather was from there. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Maivia
  22. sycasey 2.0

    The Maltese Falcon

    I'm not quite over-the-moon about The Maltese Falcon like some people are. I enjoy it all for the most part, but there are some segments where it seems to go for a lot of exposition and "tell, don't show" storytelling. It helps that the telling is done by Sydney Greenstreet, but still, it's a bit heavy on speeches that describe prior events. You can chalk some of that up to the time it was made, but . . . Citizen Kane came out the same year. That said, it's full of iconic lines and characters and is clearly a major influence, so I still vote for it to stay. And that final exchange is dynamite, really ties the room together.
  23. sycasey 2.0

    The Maltese Falcon

  24. sycasey 2.0

    Nashville

    Oddly, the vote on the Facebook forum went the other way and kicked Nashville off the list (by a close vote, like 48-52%).
  25. sycasey 2.0

    HDTGM movie defenders

    For a more granular aggregator of critical opinion, you'd probably prefer Metacritic.
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