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ol' eddy wrecks

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Everything posted by ol' eddy wrecks

  1. ol' eddy wrecks

    Best of 2018: Critics' Picks

    One weird thing about thinking about Annihilation on the AFI list, is that we live in a world where Tarkovsky's Stalker exists, and it isn't eligible for the AFI list because it's Russian. But it's weird to see an American film that is so directly influenced by it, but then the list can't have the seminal film (which is extremely well regarded internationally. it's 29th on the BFI critic's poll, 30th on the director's poll). On the flip side, that's two for two Alex Garland sci-fi films that have felt really solid and understood its material. I agree with Paul's assessment, if he gets a couple more solid entries, in, well, anything, I could see something like that happening. Though maybe not with the AFI list, since it seems to have a real hard time with independent films. I do want to say on Buster Scruggs, well, first a side-comment. I was once told that Moby Dick was a pantheistic novel, in which multiple people could interact with one physical thing in the universe and they'd all have this different way of perceiving it and what it meant to them. And if you just kind of weaved all those different things together, you got this complex, nuanced thing that was both a bit of all those things, but not necessarily any of them wholly and completely. I kind of took all the different tones of Buster Scruggs that way. We have all of these different stories of the west, what we cared about (gun slingers, bank robbers, artists trying to get by in the frontier, a miner encountering and spoiling an untouched valley for gold, and the story of nervous settlers just trying to find someone else to spend their time with as they migrate west), and all the crazy different tones in how we tell those stories. And so, it's just kind of contemplating through example, what do all these western stories add up to? (literal question about the afterlife presented in the first segment). Oh yeah, that, and death. So, I kind of loved it for what it did there. That said, I agree, there are a number of other great Coen Brothers movies, that I would expect and prefer to make the list. It did seem to get a short shrift (I think Amy's take of, "this is how we screwed it all up," seems most applicable to the Tom Waits segment, less-so the other segments).
  2. ol' eddy wrecks

    Best Of 2018: Blockbusters

    The "kid's movie" might not be the best case for the argument since that's not just "for the genre," but is making assumptions about the target audience, no? I think my answer was kind of a drift from the original complaint. It was in respect to "why do critics hate super-hero movies?" And my response seemed more akin to Amy trying to address it in the (next episode) Critics episode. Which is, I don't know if critics really hate them. Like, it is a sampling bias, but the podcasts I listen to, the critics seem to mostly enjoy them, but (outside of Amy who seems to just flat out hate the genre), the negatives seem to be of the nature of fatigue, exhaustion, and the despair of looking at the future release schedule. Now, maybe it's projection, but I only watch an MCU movie about once every other year, and it's usually well after it's left theaters (e.g. at the end of 2018, I watched Thor: Ragnarock). And as such, I end up with the experience of, "I enjoyed it. Very disposable and I don't know if I'm going to think much about it again." Though Thor was funnier than the others. But I also live in kind of a comparative cultural bubble. I don't see trailers for these movies, because I haven't had cable since 2000. Being able to not be overexposed to these movies, I don't really care about their existence, as opposed to really having any type of hate towards them. But it does leave me wondering how I would feel about them if I had to watch them even if I didn't feel like watching them. I imagine I'd start to hate them. Then again, I do watch Game of Thrones, which is a fairly empty show. A critic's job can be multiple things, so I don't fully disagree. I mean, sometimes, it's valid for them to discuss how does this entry in a genre stack up against other entries in the genre. Another thing they might engage in, what are limitations or shortcomings of this genre (or at least most known entries in the genre)? Is this movie derivative? Are we currently over-saturated with entries in this genre? Somewhat related to the above, I feel like if someone was making the case for the merits of A Nightmare on Elm Street, they're probably better positioned to do it now after we've forgotten about the campy sequels rather than in the late 80s when so many of horror movie franchise sequels were coming out. But that might just be me. I also don't think ANoES should be on the AFI all time list (and it's been too long since I've seen it), but compared to other potentially "good" horror movies, something related to the franchise horrors of the 80s, might be a better reference point for thought experiments for the present. Judging a westerns against other entries informs one's opinion of the movie, but, there's still the, "but is it 'good' compared to movies outside the genre?" Which is grudlian's point of, does it have to elevate it to the best movies of all time classification? I think choosing westerns from the AFI list is interesting as a comparison point since pretty much all the entries are considered subversive. It would be funny if the super-hero movies that made it on the AFI list were things like James Gunn's Super. Or, what Watchmen could have been (from what I've gathered. I read the GN over the years. Never saw the movie, because, Zach Snyder. I heard it discussed to death at the time. I say that one, because it's the story that would probably be considered most analogous like The Searchers). Though circling back to people dismissing action movies... Gladiator won best picture. And Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon was nominated (coincidentally the same year X-Men came out, which was ground zero for the current superhero movie boom). I don't think the former was very good. But I think action alone isn't necessarily what disqualified them from people taking them seriously. I think when there's an ephemeral quality to the current crop of superhero movies, especially the MCU (admittedly speaking from limited exposure), that's causing people to not take them seriously. But I haven't seen Black Panther, and, as the AFI list is concerned, as was pointed out in the comments section, there are action-adventure movies on the list that also don't have a lot of gravitas. Though, I can't help but wonder, if a superhero movie had the right type of drama or gravitas it would be more reasonably considered (which makes me think The Dark Knight, after we get out of the current superhero glut, might be something people won't moan at in 30 years, in terms of, "should this be on the AFI list?"). Then again, Shane is on the list, and Logan (haven't seen) was supposed to be an updated version of Shane... I would be curious what the people who voted for Shane on the AFI list felt of Logan (not talking these forums, but for the actual AFI poll). Granted, I am the person who hasn't been too big on the blockbusters on the list. But, the list is what it is (in terms of perceived strengths and perceived shortcomings). I don't know. I feel like I drifted pretty far away from annetaylorphoto's original complaint in discussing all that.
  3. ol' eddy wrecks

    Best of 2018: Critics' Picks

    Is The Rider and Sorry to Bother You mainstream? I really don't know. My consumption of film media is very different than most people's so I heard them talked about more than, say, Into the Spiderverse. Probably more than Infinity War. Or maybe I just tune those discussions out and focus more on what I'm interested in. I'm usually behind on seeing movies - related to often waiting for these things to come to streaming. So mostly films I haven't seen but I feel like I've heard people talk about a decent amount or someone said something interesting on it. Shoplifters (mentioned in the podcast) The Rider (mentioned in the podcast) Zama (mentioned in the podcast) Shirkers (hey! I've seen this one, it's not a best of the year, but might be worth watching) Marrowbone (from the director of The Orphanage) In terms of graveyard shift festival type stuff, I wanted to see The Wind Categorized under, "I want to see these, and imdb says they're 2018 films, but I haven't heard of them showing anywhere): Peter Strickland's next film In Fabric Terry Gilliam's The Man who killed Don Quixote Looking over a local film festival line-up from the past year, it looks like Olivier Assayas had another movie this year (Non-Fiction) as did Asghar Farhadi (Everybody Knows). Honestly, I was pleased with Sorry to Bother You, Annihilation, The Death of Stalin, Leave no Trace, The Favourite, The Ballad of Buster Scruggs, First Reformed (despite my possible qualms about the end), and Roma. Right the movies from 2018, I mostly want to see that I haven't are Beale Street and Shoplifters. I guess I'm just being art-house basic there.
  4. ol' eddy wrecks

    Best of 2018: Critics' Picks

    An individual's list of top films from a year often changes quite a bit over subsequent years. And as we've seen with all of these lists, they also change dramatically over time. I don't know how the list was determined, but the top 100 was done by ballot by a lot of people who probably didn't contribute to that top 10 list. What I'm saying is the meta critic list seems as good as a starting point as the AFI list. Also, no Green Book or Bohemian Rhapsody, so from my perspective that's a plus. But that's probably just confirmation bias to my taste (of movies I haven't seen, but I don't even think you could get me to spend the time to watch, either - based mainly on what critics have said).
  5. ol' eddy wrecks

    Best of 2018: Critics' Picks

    To partially answer the question and partially to not answer the question at all, the AFI put out a list of the top 10 American films for 2018 and included The Favourite. Roma was explicitly left off the list because it wasn't American, but was given a shout out. So, why to answer the part of the question of why it's being considered for the podcast of what might end up on the AFI best American movies of all time list, then according to the AFI it qualifies. As to why it qualifies according to them, the other posts in this thread are doing the tackling of sorting out the classification that makes me go, "hmmmmm...."
  6. ol' eddy wrecks

    Upcoming Episodes

    Sorry to Bother You - should still be on Hulu for those who haven't seen it. Annihilation - available on Hulu and included in your Amazon Prime subscription. The Favourite - you'll have to catch in theaters or wait until Feb 18th to rent or buy it from streaming services.
  7. ol' eddy wrecks

    Best Of 2018: Blockbusters

    That sounds like a summary of the Ethan Hawke interview, though when talking about it later, he clarified he still enjoys superhero movies, he just doesn't think they're particularly great. I do wonder if part of the reason why critics hate the over-abundance of superhero movies so much is, well, if they don't love them, given their success, they still have to watch them and talk about them for their job. Realistically, I don't know if a mainstream critic can really avoid them all if they wanted to.
  8. ol' eddy wrecks

    Best Of 2018: Blockbusters

    Star Wars was nominated for Best Picture, so you never know. Unlike the large quantity of superhero movies that have already been made though, it was, what, the second or third modern major blockbuster?
  9. ol' eddy wrecks

    Best Of 2018: Blockbusters

    She didn't really say there were the two best things though. It was more, what would most likely go on the AFI list from the top 20 grossing films - a quality that she even mentioned early in the podcast, started to really go down the tubes since about 1999. And most of the other films were disqualified because they were part of a franchise whose earlier, more notable entries (e.g. Halloween and Jurassic Park) aren't on the list, so obviously these wouldn't. Some were dismissed because she felt they were garbage. The other remaining two were in genres, that like the franchise possibilities, have other examples that deserve to be on the list more. So once you factor in all of those qualifiers, it's almost like she basically said, the top 20 grossing films, a category that has gone downhill in the last 20 years and has been over-represented by a genre that historically has not had very good entries, after dominating popular culture for the past 20 years is still in the phase of improving. Which, if you break it down that way, I guess makes sense (it's better than what happened with the horror franchises of the 80s, where they went the sequel route, devolved into self-parody, and by the 90s, and well, I'll just say, the 90s is not remembered as a golden age of horror). I do wonder if they should have completely restricted themselves to 2018. Maybe they should have used 2018 first, but then used it to talk about other blockbusters of the past 20 years (or 30 years). e.g. Okay, Fallen World won't go on the list because JP isn't on the list - but should JP go on the list? CRA and ASiB won't go on the list because there are other, better entries in the romantic-comedy and romantic-drama entries. Were there any top 20 films of the past 20 years in either of those genres that they felt should go on the list? Or maybe, "be considered for the list" might be a better starting question. Well, too late now! How did Amy find the box office stats for the entire AFI list? When I was trying to find them the list comparison posts, past a certain boxofficemojo didn't seem reliable or didn't even have the years (more the latter), so finding this stuff was a pain and gave inconsistent data. I also wonder if the top 20 box office stat is going to hold with movies after the year 2000, though I'm more curious about the top 5 instead of the top 20, which could be a data point acting as confirmation of her assessment that the box office rankings went downhill around that time - though well, only as strong of a data point as one puts stock in the AFI list.
  10. ol' eddy wrecks

    Best Of 2018: Blockbusters

    My recollection (always fallible) is there was also a Scientologist video he was in that someone leaked nearly at the same time. The ideas he espoused and his delivery in that was the real source of, "Tom Cruise," is crazy.
  11. ol' eddy wrecks

    Best Of 2018: Blockbusters

    Here's a list of top grossing movies for the year. It would probably be cumbersome to list all 20 as poll options of, would you vote for this movie on your AFI top 100 poll? https://www.boxofficemojo.com/yearly/chart/?p=.htm&yr=2018 Slightly different than Amy's since Grindenwald (sp?) passed Halloween for the top 20 spot by about $1,000. I suspect I won't have much to add to the specific movies on this one as, currently, the only movies in the top 100 I've seen are 67. Hereditary 83. Annihilation 93. The Favourite
  12. ol' eddy wrecks

    Theme Month: Jan. 2019 - Westerns

    If you have Shudder, you watch a short-ish documentary, Horror Noire, which is about African Americans in the horror genre. Though that's both actors and directors. Which is my periodic reminder that I still really need to see Ganja & Hess. ETA: I guess the only non-mainstream, but we'll known movie I can think of off the top of my head not listed yet is Killer of Sheep.
  13. ol' eddy wrecks

    Upcoming Episodes

    I'm guessing the people who care already got their email, but the criterion channel is launching April 8th. https://www.criterionchannel.com I haven't seen anything about TCM's/Filmstruck's library launching yet. No idea on its situation at the moment.
  14. ol' eddy wrecks

    The Last Picture Show

    I think my biggest issue with the movie's handling of Jacy. Her character seems to have to navigate a changing worldview of love, sex, and just, what is the world, itself. And all the different character arc points she has to jump between seem plausible and possibly complex, something in the handling of it - I just didn't feel the emotional transition between all those points. I guess another way to phrase it, the camera left me feeling like I was exterior to a teenage girl having emotional fluctuations and not the internal emotional state. I don't know how much of it might play better a second time, knowing how things play out beforehand, or what scenes that maybe I should be paying a lot more attention to. I agree with @AlmostAGhost and @sycasey 2.0 on Sonny. Compared to Jacy, I have to actually try to recall Duane's arc, so I guess it didn't leave as much of an impression on me. I guess it was the whole, went from semi-popular jock-ish guy in high school with the prettiest girl in school, to being dumped by her, thinks he'll get her back, finds out he won't, doesn't let go, kind of drops out of even blue-collar work society, just kind of drifts and loves his car. From Sonny's perspective, the drifting away/the fight is also one more part (their friendship) of the town that is lost. The more I try to recall the movie, the more I feel like there might be a lot more little details I'd appreciate a second time through - but I've only gone through once, so I can't really assume those details are there. I am a little surprised by the relatively little talk about all the age inappropriate relationships.
  15. ol' eddy wrecks

    The Last Picture Show

    I think you might be confusing her with Faye Dunaway in Bonnie & Clyde. Unless I'm missed her role. (I still need to rewatch it).
  16. ol' eddy wrecks

    Unforgiven

    "exacerbate". Egg on my face there. Maybe the group has gotten more antagonistic in tone since I stopped reading (I don't recall ever seeing posts dedicated to Amy's use of the word "incel", so as a time reference, that means it's probably been a while) - or it was more antagonistic in tone than what I remember. I recall there was brief spike in negativity of tone of the comments in the group at one point and Kate posted she got a complaint (concerns?) from someone involved with the podcast about it. I recall the nature of the complaints were subtly less antagonistic in nature after that, but the quantity still kind of wore thin with me (hence my comment about FB's UX above). Maybe it's gotten worse again.
  17. ol' eddy wrecks

    Theme Month: Jan. 2019 - Westerns

    So.... 5 Stars?
  18. ol' eddy wrecks

    Theme Month: Jan. 2019 - Westerns

    Just wondering. Since this is the HDTGM forum, did anyone watch the original midnight movie, El Topo, for this (particuarly if they haven't seen it before)?
  19. ol' eddy wrecks

    The Last Picture Show

    Despite listening to a movie podcast whose title is inspired by this movie, this is the first time I've seen it (or any Bogdonovich movie it looks like - For some reason, I did not decide to watch To Sir, with Love II, after In the Heat of the Night), and I'm still not sure what I think of it overall. I think I can confirm that I do enjoy the sound of wind blowing in movies. Even in movies, I still don't know how I entirely feel about them. Also, apparently it has to be in black and white. I guess because it makes it feel more desolate?
  20. ol' eddy wrecks

    Unforgiven

    Weird - at least in the sense that speaking as someone who was starting to really find her loose usage becoming problematic, I just kind of sighed a breath of relief when she said she was using the term wrong. Maybe not so much weird in the sense of... people. I've been trying to cut back on facebook in general, but even before that, I found myself perusing the group less and less. I suspected the disorganization of facebook's UX for the sake of ongoing discussions, as opposed to forum threads, contributed heavily to it. Even for neutral topics, it started to get tedious. I don't know if not being a member of the group and thus not interacting with the posts had a big impact, but after a while, I don't think it did. I do wonder (and suspect) that those UX shortcomings exasperate any underlying issues (in terms of quantity of nitpicking or vocal disagreements). e.g. Every time someone wants to weigh in on something Amy said that they disagree with, FB basically encourages creating an entire new post on the matter (equivalent to a thread in a forum) - as opposed to a single post in an already existing thread about the week's movie/episode. And the reply functionality doesn't really encourage multiple back & forths, so it has to just keep happening and isn't conducive to actually progress on the discussion - and that's the good faith take on the matter. By the time I kind of stopped checking in on it, I was quite sick of the, "Hi, I just joined and am catching up on episodes. I just got to episode __________ and boy, Amy was wrong about _________," post. In a forum, they could at least reasonably find the existing thread, and see if someone else had already expressed their qualms (and if there was any further discussion). I mean... they could. With facebook, even if someone was trying to be reasonable, doing the equivalent of that wouldn't be realistic. Especially with the high activity that group had.
  21. ol' eddy wrecks

    Unforgiven

    You had my curiosity at "not sure fans of the genre would even consider it a Western". Adds to ever-increasing queue. When I posed that question above, I think I forgot the HDTGM forum has a thread for January for people to talk about westerns.
  22. ol' eddy wrecks

    Unforgiven

    Coincidentally, the first person to recommend I go back and give Unforgiven a watch was in response to me talking about No Country for Old Men. There were things about True Grit that I didn't like, but lots of things I did. I enjoyed them both a lot more than Unforgiven. Though I do want to toss this out there for everyone, because I'm now wondering after a few comments. If there was a Western you'd like to see on the AFI (or whatever list), what would it be? (If it's already on there, e.g. we have to cull the number of westerns on the list, which one would you really want to keep). As part of that question, vaguely (detailed if you like), what's your take on the genre as a whole? i.e. Do you watch a lot of it? Which subgenres (classic vs. spaghetti vs. modern ones vs. indie/etc) My answer: I've mentioned it a couple of times, and mentioned it upthread, McCabe & Mrs. Miller. It's more of a historical drama revisionist take on a western, though at a high level, it is still a western (though, very much, an anti-western). And as I said upthread, I have historically not been big on the genre and didn't even watch spaghetti westerns until late in life. I've come around a bit on them more recently, but that's mainly recent ones and spaghetti westerns. I still have seen very few classic westerns (I think only: The Searchers, The Oxbow Incident - over 25 years ago, and now High Noon).
  23. ol' eddy wrecks

    Unforgiven

    On the tonal reverse of the ending of the movie, I'll throw out another example of media of that did something similar (spoilers ahead for the third season of The Wire - apologies, I've seen people do hidden blocks of text on these forums, but I can't figure out where in the UI, how you do it). In the third season of The Wire, up through the end of the season (and the two seasons prior), you get the theme of how the war on drugs has effectively become a war on the lower class. Continuing it is blocking any chance to really address the issues that come with drugs and destroying communities in the process. One of the plot points of the season is a police chief actually covertly halting the war and the consequences that come from it (good and bad). At the end of the season that whole experiment comes crashing down in front of a news crew and you get this political speech from Carcetti that he is not going to give up on the poor communities of the city, that he will fight the scourge of drugs regardless of who is afflicted. It is all very rousing and moving and plays that way. It is totally "just more of the same." And David Simon said in the commentary on the DVD that people reacted to the finale with, "so, I guess The Wire now pro-drug war now." And his response was, "Only if you haven't been paying attention to everything up until this point. I guess that's the power of media, to make you empathize with the person who's perspective you're following." I would say artistically, by making it feel like the show was believing in what Carcetti was saying, in the moment, it makes the viewer realize accurately how drug war is presented and why people continue to believe in it. And if they get moved by Carcetti's speech, they could be moved by it in real life, by real politicians. That said, I still can't get myself on board with wholly believing the film did that on purpose, and it wasn't Eastwood just reverting to basic instincts of presenting himself as the hero. I think it might just be, I didn't feel on board watching the movie in general up until that point, and didn't care for Eastwood's handling of the material. The over-acting (and the poor acting) and over-directing, made so much of the points feel heavy-handed up until that point, so doing the tonal shift feels more clever than the truthy part of my gut wants to give credit to, even if so many signs point to that I should.
  24. ol' eddy wrecks

    Unforgiven

    Whoa there, Nelly! Actively holding someone down while they get their face cut up isn't exactly nothing. In terms of a full-throated denial of the death penalty by Little Bill, in the beginning Alice (I'd say, depicted with what seems like a blood-lust), asks if he's going to hang them. And that's when he says he's going to whip them, which isn't no small thing. And, as what would have been called in more stereotypical westerns, bounty hunters show up for the reward, Little Bill keeps calling them the much less dignified term, "assassins". This seems a lot more complex in deconstructing why it's offscreen than I would have gone. The important part of Ned's death is Will's reaction shot to it. And the slow drawn out, starting to drink shot requires a somewhat lengthy delivery. If they were to show Ned's death, they'd be showing and the recapping what you just saw. Something about that redundancy doesn't play well in my mind. My take on that feels like a much darker one - change brothel to a frat house, cowboys to frat bro's, and the slicing, well, to a frat-party rape. I feel like the film does come down hard on Alice, but in the sense of someone taking someone else's tragedy and making it their cause, despite the victim's wishes. Hence above, me wondering if the movie intended for us to infer Alice exaggerated the wounds when telling patrons about the reward or if it purely magnified on its own in retelling. Which, given the analogy (which I think was supposed to be present, at least by the 1990's filming, if not the original 1970's script), is... well, it's something. Though, in what happened in the film, it does seem like a very direct line between, not having a deterrence in physical punishment does not really discourage something like that happening again in the town, which does put all prostitutes at risk (i.e. Alice, though not a direct victim, is hurt by it.) If asked what I think happen based on what the film provides, both happened (she exaggerated and then it was exaggerated in retelling). I could go into why, but the short version is the parallel with how the stories of the shoot-outs got mythologized (and also the sense of desperation to get outside help by lying about how much money they have for the reward). Exaggerated after it happened, and then exaggerated even more in later re-tellings. The issue the analogy does highlight that does give the greatest flaw in the premise of the script is Delilah. I can see her wanting to be done with the whole thing and wanting to move on from it. I have a hard time with how the movie made it feel like she basically forgave the holder and just came across so much of a naif. But admittedly, I don't have a lot of first or second hand accounts on the matter to draw from to know how far-fetched that is or not.
  25. ol' eddy wrecks

    Unforgiven

    It's interesting seeing how people are splitting on the take away of the ending (see upthread discussion).
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