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Episode 139 — I Hate Everyone


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#1 Earwolf Admin

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 11:00 PM

Paul W. Downs and Lucia Aniello of the writing/directing team Paulilu join Andrew Ti to discuss people who use the excuse of hating everyone to cover up their racism. Call us at (323) 389-RACE to ask if anything is racist.

#2 Shariq Torres

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 04:47 AM

People using this excuse are the lamest assholes in the universe. Plus, why should I care what is informing your racism. I could care less whether you're a sociopath or just whole heartedly believe in white superiority. The impact on me is still the same.

#3 dlo burns

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 12:48 AM

Along with 'friendzone' it's such a neckbeard thing to say.

#4 JamesCrackCorn

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 05:27 AM

I could never understand people who call themselves equal opportunity offenders. It seems that they think that their racism towards one group is negated by racism towards a second

#5 chmod

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 12:59 PM

Pretty sure this idea originated, at least in the popular zeitgeist, with Dirty Harry where it was pretty clear that he was racist, and homophobic and misogynist, etc. It was someone else defending him though, saying you couldn't take it personally because he was an asshole to everyone. I can't imagine anyone self describing themselves this way as an excuse or justification for anything though. Also, within the movie it was part of painting the character as a pretty unlikable, really a bad guy who did good but in a pretty bad way. It wasn't seen as an acceptable trait 42 years ago when the movie came out, and that was a time when overt racism, misogyny, and homophobia was still pretty well accepted. It should tell you something about trying to pull it today.

#6 Shariq Torres

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Posted 30 April 2013 - 02:14 PM

View Postchmod, on 30 April 2013 - 12:59 PM, said:

Pretty sure this idea originated, at least in the popular zeitgeist, with Dirty Harry where it was pretty clear that he was racist, and homophobic and misogynist, etc. It was someone else defending him though, saying you couldn't take it personally because he was an asshole to everyone. I can't imagine anyone self describing themselves this way as an excuse or justification for anything though. Also, within the movie it was part of painting the character as a pretty unlikable, really a bad guy who did good but in a pretty bad way. It wasn't seen as an acceptable trait 42 years ago when the movie came out, and that was a time when overt racism, misogyny, and homophobia was still pretty well accepted. It should tell you something about trying to pull it today.


You're wrong. This idea is an outgrowth of the mid to late 90s when the conservative backlash to political correctness (i.e., "what do you mean I can't call them faggots?"). This idea was basically trying to manage people's reactions when someone would say some foul shit. Because how can you get mad, if he (usually was a guy) said foul shit about everyone? A parallel to this idea is that if you say foul shit about all groups, that means that you're really speaking the "truth" about the situation and refuse to be hampered by the "P.C. bullshit". This is the excuse that the South Park creators would often invoke.