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Episode 223 — Perceptions of Cool


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#1 Brett Arnold

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 09:09 PM

Andrew Ti and this week’s special guest Patrick Walsh finish off the week by talking about stereotypes that could be considered positive and perceptions of cool based on race. As always, leave us a message about anything you think is racist at (323) 389-RACE.

#2 Cabbage

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 04:58 AM

Andrew you have some arrogant fucking friends.

#3 Shariq Torres

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 05:19 AM

The type of stereotypes that Andrew and Patrick spoke about in this episode are something that is used to box people and negate anything that they do. If there is this stereotype that Asians are good at math then it automatically negates anything that an Asian mathematician accomplishes. Because, of course, it was easy for Dr. Nguyen to solve this difficult problem because Asians are good at math. He really didn't have to "work" at it like the [insert other race] mathematicians.

It goes the same for athletics. If the stereotype is that Black folks are good at sports, then it negates anything that they accomplish in that realm. Because, of course, it was easy for them to become good at this sport. They didn't have to "work" for it like the [insert other race] athletes.

But what it also does is that it creates boundaries that society tells you are not supposed to go outside of. So that Asian kid with quick hands and feet who likes boxing is not allowed to explore that. He is given math books and told to solve for "x" even though he is a dummy when it comes to math.

The Black kid that is uncoordinated and clumsy is still pushed into sports despite his obvious shortcomings. And even though he is a whiz at algebra, no one is going to support him in that endeavor because he is going outside of the box.

People are not walking stereotypes because stereotypes are not true. They are fantasy. And if you're going to believe in fantasy, you might as well make it more entertaining than Black people do X and Asian people do Y and White people do Z. Throw in some dragons. Add some elves and mech robots.

#4 JamesCrackCorn

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 05:30 AM

View PostShariq Torres, on 23 August 2013 - 05:19 AM, said:

The type of stereotypes that Andrew and Patrick spoke about in this episode are something that is used to box people and negate anything that they do. If there is this stereotype that Asians are good at math then it automatically negates anything that an Asian mathematician accomplishes. Because, of course, it was easy for Dr. Nguyen to solve this difficult problem because Asians are good at math. He really didn't have to "work" at it like the [insert other race] mathematicians.

It goes the same for athletics. If the stereotype is that Black folks are good at sports, then it negates anything that they accomplish in that realm. Because, of course, it was easy for them to become good at this sport. They didn't have to "work" for it like the [insert other race] athletes.

But what it also does is that it creates boundaries that society tells you are not supposed to go outside of. So that Asian kid with quick hands and feet who likes boxing is not allowed to explore that. He is given math books and told to solve for "x" even though he is a dummy when it comes to math.

The Black kid that is uncoordinated and clumsy is still pushed into sports despite his obvious shortcomings. And even though he is a whiz at algebra, no one is going to support him in that endeavor because he is going outside of the box.

People are not walking stereotypes because stereotypes are not true. They are fantasy. And if you're going to believe in fantasy, you might as well make it more entertaining than Black people do X and Asian people do Y and White people do Z. Throw in some dragons. Add some elves and mech robots.


Polynesian craftsmen work really well with mythril.

#5 .....

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 07:45 AM

.

#6 pfchangs

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 08:37 AM

I feel like the nonwhite people who were like "oh, that's why you're cool" to the half-white girl meant it in more of a "oh you're not acting like a fucking weirdo around me like how most white people do because they're intimidated/confused by my not being white" kind of way and then she always ruins it with white person indignation and they're like "damn, so close."

#7 meshair

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 08:42 AM

Every time I hear this kind of thing, I'm reminded of this (quoted from Mismeasure of Man):

"They devour half-putrified carrion. They are given to orgies, love a noise, and make a great outcry in the markets. They murder in cold blood in order to rob, and were formerly suspected of cannibalism.…"

But it's not all bad news, because, "It is to be noted that this race, so low morally and so incapable of cultural and intellectual development, a race that can never carry on any industry , and which in poetry has not got beyond the poorest lyrics, has created in Hungary a marvelous musical art— a new proof of the genius that, mixed with atavism, is to be found in the criminal..." (Lombroso, 1911)

I personally feel that the "black people are cool" stuff is just a modern version of that; America has a long list of vicious steretypes about non-whites, and adding "but they sure can dance!" to the end of that list doesn't make it any better.