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Episode 72: THE ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD

  

62 members have voted

  1. 1. Should THE ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD Be In The Canon?

    • Yay!
      58
    • Nay!
      4


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Tally ho, good chaps! What will it be for Errol Flynn's swashbuckling adventure - say thee yay or nay?

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This is possibly my favorite movie as well. The feelings of childhood I get while watching it makes me feel all warm and cozy inside, and I don't think I've ever seen a better onscreen romance. This has been the easiest yes of the entire show for me.

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I watched this for the first time last night. Echoing what Amy said, I was surprised to discover that every other version of Robin Hood I've seen in my life was heavily influenced by this. The Disney adaptation, Mel Brooks' Men in Tights (Cary Elwes was born to succeed Flynn in everything, especially his Princess Bride performance), even some aspects of Kevin Costner's version stole from this amazing technicolor marvel from the 30s. SO Canon-worthy.

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If The Adventures of Robin Hood gets in with anything less than a unanimous (or near-unanimous) vote—or, worse yet, doesn't get in at all—I will be very disappointed with The Canon's audience. This is absolutely one of my all-time favorite films, and even though I saw it when I was still a kid, I was in high school, just the right age to be stupidly cynical and dismissive of something this old-fashioned and fun. (Admittedly, this is when I was getting into a phase of trying to catch up on historically important movies—especially anything people suggested had been an influence on Star Wars—because I was still young and hopeful enough to believe I would one day become a film director.) I just can't say enough what a thoroughly wonderful viewing experience it is. There is nothing about The Adventures of Robin Hood that doesn't work.

 

Aside from that, the story of a nobleman who shuns other nobles—and, to an extent, his own nobility—in the interest of doing what is right for the common people is something that's always spoken to my bleeding liberal heart. I can only imagine how this resonated with a country just beginning to emerge from its long, hard climb out of the Great Depression.

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I know of the movie's importance. I get its influence. It will 100% get in the canon. But...

 

I find Flynn's Robin Hood to be among the most insufferable protagonists ever. He irritates me and sort of makes it borderline impossible to enjoy this movie. Beyond that, because this movie is something I'm coming to do as an adult that's seen all the endless media that this movie influenced, my viewing of it last week felt like it came probably a little too late. Sometimes you see the original and it stands up to the test of time. Sometimes it feels like its been stripped of all its original spark by everything that came after it. And this fell into the latter camp for me.

 

So it's a nay for me with the total understanding that it will likely get in easily and probably should be in. I just don't personally like the movie, finding it irritating (largely due to Flynn's Robin) and dull (largely because I've seen the beats of this story told over and over again in movie's likely influenced by this one).

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This episode is an example of why I love this show. I watched this about two weeks ago for the first time. I was a sci-fi kid, not caring much for swashbuckling and fantasy. Therefore, this was not a staple of my childhood. In watching this film I understood some reasons for its nomination, such as the color, or Flynn's performance. I did not fully grasp the nuance of de Havilland, or the rawness to the fight scenes and stunts. The discussion illuminated these elements for me, and moved my vote from a soft yes to a hard yes.

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I know of the movie's importance. I get its influence. It will 100% get in the canon. But...

 

I find Flynn's Robin Hood to be among the most insufferable protagonists ever. He irritates me and sort of makes it borderline impossible to enjoy this movie. Beyond that, because this movie is something I'm coming to do as an adult that's seen all the endless media that this movie influenced, my viewing of it last week felt like it came probably a little too late. Sometimes you see the original and it stands up to the test of time. Sometimes it feels like its been stripped of all its original spark by everything that came after it. And this fell into the latter camp for me.

 

So it's a nay for me with the total understanding that it will likely get in easily and probably should be in. I just don't personally like the movie, finding it irritating (largely due to Flynn's Robin) and dull (largely because I've seen the beats of this story told over and over again in movie's likely influenced by this one).

You and I can never be friends.

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Easy yes. Having never seen it before, I was pleasantly surprised. When it began I kind of cringed, thinking that the tone, dialogue, costumes, and sets would just come off very elementary school level through a modern viewing. I was pretty immediately proven wrong.

 

This movie's smart, fun, and tells a simple story with a depth of personality and emotion. The beginning banquet scene was SO tense, and the final swordfighting sequence was gripping. It really is an anti-Game of Thones, and it's a wonder that it maintains such a fairy tale sensibility of the story without feeling thin or immature.

 

The only element that fell flat to me were the friends of Robin Hood, who really failed to stand out both in writing and performance. But it's a standout film that belongs in the Canon.

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Did anyone else let out a spontaneous "f**k yeah!" during the escape sequence when Robin Hood cut the rope and then let its momentum carry him to the top of the gate? I loved that moment and this movie so, so much.

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Yes. Fun fact I just found on wikipedia: The guy playing Little John, Alan Hale, already played the same character in the 1922 Douglas Fairbanks film, and would play it again in 1950. Thus, he played the same role for a 28-year-span, making this one of the longest period over which any film actor played the same major role, second only to Stallone's Rocky.

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Clearly culturally important for every adventure movie since. Yep- It's in.

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Oh, this movie's in like...like, a lot. Like, really. I don't even know what to say about it. If you don't get it, check your meds, see your doctor, go for a walk, clear your head, and try to have some fun. Just like all those people back during The Great Depression knew how to do.

 

First ballot. In. In. In. In. IN!!!!!!!

 

I know of the movie's importance. I get its influence. It will 100% get in the canon. But...

 

OUT!! :angry:

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But I have roasted meats, green tights and a willingness to laugh at any joke you make.

I'll give you a shot then.

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I say No. This might actually be the best version of the Robin Hood story, but that story has been told sooooo my times. That and the obviously sped up fight scene at the end is really silly. It undercuts anything great in the film.

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Star Wars and this are probably my two favorite films from childhood, when I rewatched it for the first time in a good couple of years I was immediately drawn back in to its world of daring bravado and charm painting it as one of my favorite films as an adult. This is an absolute yes it's DNA is in every other great adventure film that followed it's beautiful perfect and elegant. Also if I remember correctly the arrow that gets split was made of a hollow strip of bamboo thus making it possible to split it as shown, also that archer had to use a specially sized bow since he was so tall and it gave his arrows a distinctive zip that you hear in the film, you can also hear it in Raiders of the Lost Ark since Ben Burtt loved the sound and used it for the arrows of the natives at the start.

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I saw this for the first time yesterday and it's crazy how every version of Robin Hood I've ever seen is just a blatant rip-off of this movie. Just great swashbuckling, Technicolor adventure, and once of the most charming adventure movies I've ever seen. Hell yes it belongs in the Canon.

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I had never seen this movie before and probably wouldn't have if not for this podcast. Thank you very much.

 

This is a wonderful adventure film and I happily voted yay. I see why it reminds so many people of childhood, as this movie has the spontaneity and the exuberance of a child. It can't wait to get to the next scene just to show it to us, in the way a child would show us his drawings or his toys.

 

Errol Flynn carries this movie, and all the qualities of Robin of Locksley are showcased through his interactions with other characters. He is as noble as Prince John is treacherous, as honest as Guy of Gisbourne is perfidious and as daring as Lady Marian is reserved. I hardly see how anyone else could have given such a performance.

 

I watched the movie after I listened to the podcast, and I was surprised to see how brisk the pace is during the archery competition. In what seems like a moment, we are already down to the duel, and even the duel goes very quickly: bullseye, bullseye, move the target, bullseye, split the arrow. A more modern movie would have milked this moment for all its worth (and even more), while this one barely gloss over this incredible achievement. Keep it moving!

 

The only scene that rings weird for me is the feast scene in Sherwood. All the merry men eat what amount to copious quantities of food, while the poor and the injured are in the other part, not at the main banquet and Robin barely ask them if they have eaten, while showing them off to Lady Marian as a proof of his goodness.

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I watched this film for the first time yesterday and didn't realize that it was from 1938 until listening to the episode. It just feels so modern. You can really see how much subsequent action films owe to it. HUGE yes!

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A hardy yay! Ha Ha! As was the case with others in our Merry Canon Crew, this was my first time viewing of The Adventures of Robin Hood. I didn't have any interest going in because I felt the Disney cartoon and Men In Tights were the only versions of Robin that I needed. But, after the banquet scene I can admit I was wrong.

 

My stray observations: I can't get over the use of that deer, the moments with Bess and Much, Erroll Flynn's stunts and pretty much all the action in general. Way more murder than I was expecting.

 

This is why the podcast continues to be my favorite, I get to give films a chance I normally wouldn't and am always pleasantly surprised.

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My simple answer for yes; even if The Adventures of Robin Hood doesn't stand out as one of your favorites (it's not one of mine based on my first viewing this morning,) it's a clear mark that 30s action movies can totally hold up to a modern watch. i got so frustrated when trying to talk with some of my fellow students programming a summer movie series and talking about "classic action." They kept trying to say that it would be hard to find classic action movies; the two or three of us who know about Buster, Douglas, and Errol quickly found ourselves getting a little red in the face repeating that there are totally great action movies long before 007 picks up that pistol.

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