Jump to content


Episode 31 — What Is Dead Frog?


5 replies to this topic

#1 Earwolf Admin

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,202 posts

Posted 31 August 2011 - 11:01 PM

Todd Jackson is a comedy writer andentrepreneurwho hopped from Cracked Magazine to Comedy Central before creating the comedy website Dead-Frog. He joins Jeff on this unusual episode to discuss 9/11, strange-sounding networking advice, and the potential relationship between our two websites. This isn't your typical The Wolf Den, but then again what IS a typical The Wolf Den?



#2 Steve K.

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 01 September 2011 - 09:47 AM

To touch on your point regarding what the Wolf Den actually is, I believe this show has essentially become the digital age’s press release. The Wolf Den provides corporate updates, educates the consumer on topics they care about, and encourages discussion in a personalized environment; all key attributes that companies (in any sector) are hoping to grasp within their social media programs. And thank God for this….press releases are Les Miserables! The Wolf Den listener should understand that filters must exist. If they don’t, then they are probably just weirdoes.

In terms of the creation and maintenance of the 'touring database,' this can effectively exist by allocating these duties to an intern or entry level personnel. The duties could include bi-daily or weekly in-depth research of the internet, such as the comedian’s website, live nation/ticket master, and the actual venue websites to ensure that the information is correct and up to date. Google alerts is also helpful. If anything, you could even have them do weekly calls to the venues to confirm that nothing has changed. A second set of quality control eyes (also an intern) would be beneficial. Does your partnership with Funny or Die include the "borrowing" of personnel?



#3 Bucho

    Women sense my power

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 228 posts
  • LocationThe Future, aka Auckland, New Zealand

Posted 05 September 2011 - 04:12 AM

You're damn right that listeners should accept that boundaries and filters must exist. Even on podcasts much more personal and revealing than Wolf Den - podcasts which trade in some way on openness and vulnerability - if there's any sort of professionalism there must also be boundaries.
.
Speaking of an openness of sorts, I enjoyed hearing the personal 9/11 stories. I'm sure by this time next week I might be on media blackout just to avoid 9/11 overload, but you guys got in early and I was down with it.



#4 Earwolf Admin

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 1,202 posts

Posted 31 August 2011 - 11:01 PM

Todd Jackson is a comedy writer andentrepreneurwho hopped from Cracked Magazine to Comedy Central before creating the comedy website Dead-Frog. He joins Jeff on this unusual episode to discuss 9/11, strange-sounding networking advice, and the potential relationship between our two websites. This isn't your typical The Wolf Den, but then again what IS a typical The Wolf Den?



#5 Steve K.

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 01 September 2011 - 09:47 AM

To touch on your point regarding what the Wolf Den actually is, I believe this show has essentially become the digital age’s press release. The Wolf Den provides corporate updates, educates the consumer on topics they care about, and encourages discussion in a personalized environment; all key attributes that companies (in any sector) are hoping to grasp within their social media programs. And thank God for this….press releases are Les Miserables! The Wolf Den listener should understand that filters must exist. If they don’t, then they are probably just weirdoes.

In terms of the creation and maintenance of the 'touring database,' this can effectively exist by allocating these duties to an intern or entry level personnel. The duties could include bi-daily or weekly in-depth research of the internet, such as the comedian’s website, live nation/ticket master, and the actual venue websites to ensure that the information is correct and up to date. Google alerts is also helpful. If anything, you could even have them do weekly calls to the venues to confirm that nothing has changed. A second set of quality control eyes (also an intern) would be beneficial. Does your partnership with Funny or Die include the "borrowing" of personnel?



#6 Bucho

    Women sense my power

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 228 posts
  • LocationThe Future, aka Auckland, New Zealand

Posted 05 September 2011 - 04:12 AM

You're damn right that listeners should accept that boundaries and filters must exist. Even on podcasts much more personal and revealing than Wolf Den - podcasts which trade in some way on openness and vulnerability - if there's any sort of professionalism there must also be boundaries.
.
Speaking of an openness of sorts, I enjoyed hearing the personal 9/11 stories. I'm sure by this time next week I might be on media blackout just to avoid 9/11 overload, but you guys got in early and I was down with it.