Jump to content
Welcome to the new Earwolf Forums! Read more... ×
JulyDiaz

Episode 177 - The Disaster Artist

Recommended Posts

And something else that I've noticed about the Awards is the average age of the winners. Women seem to win younger (Jlaw, Brie, Emma Stone) while the men don't win until they're more mature (Colin Firth, Jeff Bridges, Leo). Now I don't know how much weight that really has on things but it does seem quite odd when put under a microscope.

Unfortunately, I think this is because, in Hollywood, once an actress hits 35 (or younger), she is considered "used up," while many male actors can have a second act as a leading men even into their 60s (Liam Neeson, for example). While there is certainly a reverence for actresses that have maid it through the Hollywood grist mill to old age, like Judi Dench, Hellen Mirren, or Meryl Streep, unless you're Julia Roberts, Kate Winslet, or Nicole Kidman, the meaty roles that win male actors Oscars past 40 just aren't there for women. There's, of course, Sad Wife or Concerned Mother, but those don't win anybody Oscars.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

Unfortunately, I think this is because, in Hollywood, once an actress hits 35 (or younger), she is considered "used up," while many male actors can have a second act as a leading men even into their 60s (Liam Neeson, for example). While there is certainly a reverence for actresses that have maid it through the Hollywood grist mill to old age, like Judi Dench, Hellen Mirren, or Meryl Streep, unless you're Julia Roberts, Kate Winslet, or Nicole Kidman, the meaty roles that win male actors Oscars past 40 just aren't there for women. There's, of course, Sad Wife or Concerned Mother, but those don't win anybody Oscars.

This is pretty much what I was hinting at but I wasn't sure if that was the actual case or not. It's definitely something that has caught my eye within the last 7 years that I've genuinely hunkered down and charted awards season results. Here's an interesting Wiki article that actually lists out the oldest and youngest winners in all the acting categories plus the directing category. It definitely points out that the youngest man to win was 20 while the youngest woman to win was fuckin 10 lol.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

SAG nominations were released! The Big Sick got an Ensemble nom, Holly Hunter got a Supporting Actress nom, and Paul was included in the Ensemble nom of Veep!!!

I saw the LA Times headline was that Hanks and Streep did NOT get nominated and I was like "maybe some people on the HDTGM boards are in SAG?" Haha. I didn't see that Paul was nominated though! YAY.

 

ETA: From the Deadline list:

 

VEEP (HBO)

DAN BAKKEDAHL / Roger Furlong

ANNA CHLUMSKY / Amy Brookheimer

GARY COLE / Kent Davison

MARGARET COLIN / Jane McCabe

KEVIN DUNN / Ben Cafferty

CLEA DUVALL / Marjorie Palmiotti

NELSON FRANKLIN / Will

TONY HALE / Gary Walsh

JULIA LOUIS-DREYFUS / Selina Meyer

SAM RICHARDSON / Richard Splett

(continued on next page)

PAUL SCHEER / Stevie

REID SCOTT / Dan Egan

TIMOTHY SIMONS / Jonah Ryan

SARAH SUTHERLAND / Catherine Meyer

MATT WALSH / Mike McLintock

 

Continued on next page was my favorite on Veep. He's really good in everything.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

Historically for the last 22 years the movie that won Best Picture was nominated for Best Ensemble at the SAG awards. Typically each film nominated in SAG then goes on to be nominated for the Oscars. My guess this year is that Lady Bird will take the win but I still see strong potential in Get Out. It may not be a "typical" Oscar movie within the most recent years but there's always something that breaks the mold (like Beauty and the Beast being the first animated movie to be nominated for Best Picture).

I don't know enough about how the awards shows operate. I know they have a ton of overlap but that's about it. This is interesting.

Share this post


Link to post

I still love Birdman but I am not angry that Redmayne won. His was a remarkable performance.

 

But that's also goes back to what Ryan Sz and The_Triple_Lindy were saying about both the predictability of the awards and the campaigning that goes on to determine both the nominees and the winners. It is largely a sham, but I don't want that to contribute to people, including me, resenting the people who do win. All this studio self-congratulating and millions of dollars studios spend to pat themselves on the back, it just makes a win from, say, Streep or Daniel Day Lewis, less meaningful. I shouldn't be tired of those great artists making art, yet there is a system in place that forces their greatness down are throats and it becomes less meaningful. We all lose. Greta Gerwig and the Big Sick don't get nominated (FUCKING BULLSHIT) and then we resent the winners because of it. Everyone loses.

I don't hold it against multi-winners getting wins simply for being them but rather the use of them as bait to get awards. And considering the fact that these award shows are basically ways for studios to bilk out a few more dollars from audiences by attaching some random award to the poster and wrapping it in Laurel Leaves, making them think this movie needs to be seen because it won a fan award at the Vine Film Festival in Santa Rosa. I think now the actors do it more so for the swag bags which can run in the tens, or in the case of the Oscars, hundreds of thousands of dollars. Before winning an award like an Oscar would be used to increase one's value in contract negotiations, but now box office is a bigger player in determining that, so award shows are basically ego wank fests.

 

Historically for the last 22 years the movie that won Best Picture was nominated for Best Ensemble at the SAG awards. Typically each film nominated in SAG then goes on to be nominated for the Oscars. My guess this year is that Lady Bird will take the win but I still see strong potential in Get Out. It may not be a "typical" Oscar movie within the most recent years but there's always something that breaks the mold (like Beauty and the Beast being the first animated movie to be nominated for Best Picture).

The Oscars have never been kind to the horror genre, albeit Get Out is more psychological/thriller like Silence of the Lambs was, rather than a slasher or ghost film, so it may stand a better chance of nomination on the big show. Remember that the Oscars included the Twilight series as part of their homage to horror a few years back, but they never seem to want to acknowledge that almost EVERY A-list actor in Hollywood got their first big break in a horror movie (Clooney, Bacon, DiCaprio, etc.) or some summer softcore skin flick like in the case of Kevin Costner or David Duchovny.

 

There's, of course, Sad Wife or Concerned Mother, but those don't win anybody Oscars.

I don't know, I would be stunned if Frances McDormand doesn't win for Three Billboard Outside Ebbing, Missouri, though to be fair there were so many more layers to that role outside of concerned mother.

 

As of right now here are my guesses for the top three categories:

 

Film: Dunkirk, Three Billboards, Darkest Hour, The Post, Lady Bird, The Disaster Artist, The Shape of Water, Get Out (maybe), Logan and Wonder Woman (big maybies)

Actor: James Franco, Gary Oldman, Tom Hanks, Daniel Day-Lewis, Daniel Kaluuya, Hugh Jackman and Christian Bale (maybies)

Actress: Frances McDormand, Meryl Streep, Sally Hawkins, Margot Robbie, Judy Dench, Saoirse Ronan (maybe)

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

 

 

The Oscars have never been kind to the horror genre, albeit Get Out is more psychological/thriller like Silence of the Lambs was, rather than a slasher or ghost film, so it may stand a better chance of nomination on the big show.

 

I’ll never forgive the Academy for snubbing Pumpkinhead...

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post

I’ll never forgive the Academy for snubbing Pumpkinhead...

The motherfuckers, and lest we forget the great shunning of arguably one of the greatest horror films of all time:

220px-Jack_Frost_VideoCover.png

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

 

The motherfuckers, and lest we forget the great shunning of arguably one of the greatest horror films of all time:

220px-Jack_Frost_VideoCover.png

 

WHERE. IS. GHOULIES!?!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

Historically for the last 22 years the movie that won Best Picture was nominated for Best Ensemble at the SAG awards. Typically each film nominated in SAG then goes on to be nominated for the Oscars. My guess this year is that Lady Bird will take the win but I still see strong potential in Get Out. It may not be a "typical" Oscar movie within the most recent years but there's always something that breaks the mold (like Beauty and the Beast being the first animated movie to be nominated for Best Picture).

This is why I kind of have a problem with the whole idea of a "best picture." Like, how do you even fucking compare Lady Bird and Get Out? They're both such fantastic movies, but they couldn't be more different, and trying to figure out which is better is nuts to me.

 

I saw The Room for the first time on Friday night and The Disaster Artist on Sunday. There were lots of fans and the amount of spoons thrown during The Room was INSANE. The Disaster Artist was good and James Franco really disappeared into the role. Usually when I see famous actors I have a hard time not telling myself "I'm watching x play a role." This was very good.

 

Searching around I found that the actors have started to embrace their infamy. One person commented that Juliette Danielle (Lisa) has gotten back into acting and is very engaging on her Facebook page. I found it and she links to two episodes of a Where Are They Now? mockumentary. Here are episodes 1 and 2.

That's great! Greg talks about how she's really funny and sweet in his book, so I'm glad that she's able to laugh at it all because she probably got it worse than anyone other than maybe Greg. Also, I love Carolyn Minnott in those videos you linked. She's hilarious.

 

Edit: also, Robyn Paris (Michelle) wrote and directed those videos!

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post

This is why I kind of have a problem with the whole idea of a "best picture." Like, how do you even fucking compare Lady Bird and Get Out? They're both such fantastic movies, but they couldn't be more different, and trying to figure out which is better is nuts to me.

To be fair both are horror movies, and if you don't think that's true about Lady Bird, then you obviously have never lived in Sacramento.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post

To be fair both are horror movies, and if you don't think that's true about Lady Bird, then you obviously have never lived in Sacramento.

I forget where I read this, but one reviewer pointed out that Sacramento is the kind of city that parents move to "for the kids". For me it feels like the part of California that most resembles Florida.

Share this post


Link to post

I forget where I read this, but one reviewer pointed out that Sacramento is the kind of city that parents move to "for the kids". For me it feels like the part of California that most resembles Florida.

That would be Fresno.

Share this post


Link to post

Historically for the last 22 years the movie that won Best Picture was nominated for Best Ensemble at the SAG awards. Typically each film nominated in SAG then goes on to be nominated for the Oscars. My guess this year is that Lady Bird will take the win but I still see strong potential in Get Out. It may not be a "typical" Oscar movie within the most recent years but there's always something that breaks the mold (like Beauty and the Beast being the first animated movie to be nominated for Best Picture).

I just learned how Best Ensemble works for the SAG Awards, and it's really gross. Basically, you have to have your own title card to be included in the nomination. If you have a shared card, you're out of luck. So that means all of these people got screwed for it:

 

The Big Sick - Aidy Bryant, Bo Burnham, Kurt Braunohler, Vella Lovell

Get Out - Lil Rel, Betty Gabriel, Marcus Henderson

 

Lady Bird and Three Billboards both have an unusual amount of single title cards (each coming in at 11), so that's why they have a bunch more nominees. I haven't seen Mudbound yet, so I don't know if there are any big snubs there, but especially with Get Out, it's a shame that two of the best performances in the movie IMO (Lil Rel and Betty Gabriel) don't get to be included in the awards by their own union...

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

I just learned how Best Ensemble works for the SAG Awards, and it's really gross. Basically, you have to have your own title card to be included in the nomination. If you have a shared card, you're out of luck. So that means all of these people got screwed for it:

 

The Big Sick - Aidy Bryant, Bo Burnham, Kurt Braunohler, Vella Lovell

Get Out - Lil Rel, Betty Gabriel, Marcus Henderson

 

Lady Bird and Three Billboards both have an unusual amount of single title cards (each coming in at 11), so that's why they have a bunch more nominees. I haven't seen Mudbound yet, so I don't know if there are any big snubs there, but especially with Get Out, it's a shame that two of the best performances in the movie IMO (Lil Rel and Betty Gabriel) don't get to be included in the awards by their own union...

I have to assume that is part of the Guild rules in regards to credit and contracts, sort of like how there have to be two credit runs in a film no matter where, which is why we now get animated credits followed by the standard text crawl over a black screen at the end of the movie.This reminds me of a few years back when The Departed won Best Picture, as Brad Pitt technically should have won an Oscar for that as he was a producer on the film, but for some reason the Producer Guild and Academy decided that only Graham King would get the Oscar. It was originally said that was because Pitt was a more involved producer on other nominated films, but looking at it just now, there really isn't a clear reason given. Same goes for Walton Goggins, who actually accepted an Oscar for his short film The Accountant, but again to various rules, is not credited as an Oscar winner.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

I just learned how Best Ensemble works for the SAG Awards, and it's really gross. Basically, you have to have your own title card to be included in the nomination. If you have a shared card, you're out of luck. So that means all of these people got screwed for it:

 

The Big Sick - Aidy Bryant, Bo Burnham, Kurt Braunohler, Vella Lovell

Get Out - Lil Rel, Betty Gabriel, Marcus Henderson

 

Lady Bird and Three Billboards both have an unusual amount of single title cards (each coming in at 11), so that's why they have a bunch more nominees. I haven't seen Mudbound yet, so I don't know if there are any big snubs there, but especially with Get Out, it's a shame that two of the best performances in the movie IMO (Lil Rel and Betty Gabriel) don't get to be included in the awards by their own union...

I didn't know this but at least we all know in our heart that Lil Rel, Betty, and Marcus were a huuuge part of that cast. I am sad that the rest of The Big Sick didn't get nominated but honestly they didn't have as major a role in that plot as the the others did for Get Out. It definitely would not have been the same movie without them.

 

Mudbound didn't snub anyone. The cast listed is pretty much the cast with some other background characters that have a few lines. It's a really spectacular and touching film though and I highly recommend it.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

I don't know, I would be stunned if Frances McDormand doesn't win for Three Billboard Outside Ebbing, Missouri, though to be fair there were so many more layers to that role outside of concerned mother.

*late reply*

Oh, I hope she does. She was a force of nature in that role and that movie is great. It's a wonderful, creative screenplay meeting a great actress and I felt very fulfilled by the movie, as bleak as much of it was. A lot of the "laugh lines" weren't even funny to me, just sad, as they were those characters trying to cope with and hide from their despair and fear, which humanized them even more than a joke would.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

I fucking LOVED Paul in this movie.

 

The part where they're about to shoot the sex scene, and James Franco says "Ewwww, what is that on your shoulder! It's disgusting!" and Paul comes storming out like a good guy pro-wrestler, I loved it.

 

It's not even bias because I'm such a huge fan of his, he was great.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

*late reply*

Oh, I hope she does. She was a force of nature in that role and that movie is great. It's a wonderful, creative screenplay meeting a great actress and I felt very fulfilled by the movie, as bleak as much of it was. A lot of the "laugh lines" weren't even funny to me, just sad, as they were those characters trying to cope with and hide from their despair and fear, which humanized them even more than a joke would.

Omg I had that same thing with the "laugh lines!" Like there was a guy that laughed at some really dark things and I was sitting there so uncomfortable thinking "this isn't funny?" but I'm wondering if it was the delivery of those lines mixed with the actual dark humor that made him think those weren't truths but rather jokes??? Idk but it kinda really took me out of the movie and lessened my enjoyment of it. But Frances McDormand is still my top performance of the year! She brought me to tears throughout the whole thing!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

Omg I had that same thing with the "laugh lines!" Like there was a guy that laughed at some really dark things and I was sitting there so uncomfortable thinking "this isn't funny?" but I'm wondering if it was the delivery of those lines mixed with the actual dark humor that made him think those weren't truths but rather jokes??? Idk but it kinda really took me out of the movie and lessened my enjoyment of it. But Frances McDormand is still my top performance of the year! She brought me to tears throughout the whole thing!

I really liked that movie, and then the final act was such a letdown that it almost ruined the whole thing for me. I LOVE McDormand, and she's perfect for the role; I just wish everything after a certain event happened had been different.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

I really liked that movie, and then the final act was such a letdown that it almost ruined the whole thing for me. I LOVE McDormand, and she's perfect for the role; I just wish everything after a certain event happened had been different.

The final act didn't ruin the whole movie for me while watching, but it really leaves a sour taste in my mouth.

 

 

Sam Rockwell's character change really, really bothers me. I don't think it's earned at all. The movie really attempts to address a serious, complex issues facing people of color, police officers, parents dealing with loss. And Sam Rockwell is just a fucking incompetent, racist piece of garbage. It's a bit too silly for the movie, but it mostly works as a thematic foil for both Frances McDormand and Woody Harrelson. So, I'm mostly fine with it.

 

But he just turns it around into a competent, hard working police officer (well, mostly I guess). A guy who thought it was fine to joke around about beating a man and throwing him out a window minutes earlier doesn't feel like he will improve. Especially when we're talking a month later. I just don't believe it even with what he'd been through. I also think it lets racist cops off the hook even though I think that's unintentional.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post

The final act didn't ruin the whole movie for me while watching, but it really leaves a sour taste in my mouth.

 

 

Sam Rockwell's character change really, really bothers me. I don't think it's earned at all. The movie really attempts to address a serious, complex issues facing people of color, police officers, parents dealing with loss. And Sam Rockwell is just a fucking incompetent, racist piece of garbage. It's a bit too silly for the movie, but it mostly works as a thematic foil for both Frances McDormand and Woody Harrelson. So, I'm mostly fine with it.

 

But he just turns it around into a competent, hard working police officer (well, mostly I guess). A guy who thought it was fine to joke around about beating a man and throwing him out a window minutes earlier doesn't feel like he will improve. Especially when we're talking a month later. I just don't believe it even with what he'd been through. I also think it lets racist cops off the hook even though I think that's unintentional.

 

I completely agree with all of that.

 

 

And to me since he then is shown to have the full support of Woody and Frances in the end it seems like a slap in the face to every person he had terrorized with his police brutality just DAYS before and years prior.

 

The one thing I did like about it is that while the military guy was beating the shit out of him the two black people in the movie still were like trying to save him. That was the true showing of good humanity.

 

Share this post


Link to post

I completely agree with all of that.

 

 

And to me since he then is shown to have the full support of Woody and Frances in the end it seems like a slap in the face to every person he had terrorized with his police brutality just DAYS before and years prior.

 

The one thing I did like about it is that while the military guy was beating the shit out of him the two black people in the movie still were like trying to save him. That was the true showing of good humanity.

 

YOU MEAN SHITSTAIN?!

 

I want him in everything!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×