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Episode 179 - Second Sight: LIVE!


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#41 grudlian.

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 07:39 PM

View Posttomspanks, on 05 January 2018 - 04:24 PM, said:


You'll have to take me along, bc I seem to have lost the map.

Are we arguing John Larroquette is not a good looking man? Or just not a sex symbol?

I'd argue he is attractive. The posted photo is pretty 1980s and that may not be appealing 30 years later. I'm sure middle aged women in the 1980s probably thought he was pretty good looking. Looking at a recent picture of him, I'd say he looks better now.

Posted Image

I'm not sure John Larroquette was ever really marketed as a sex symbol. Maybe I'm splitting hairs on the definition of sex symbol. Dan Fielding (and I think that's where this reputation truly comes from) had a lot of sex with a lot of different women. He was also portrayed as being desperate, getting turned down or slapped by disgusted women he approached, sleeping with blowup dolls and, I think, prostitutes on occasion. Not really sex symbol behavior or reputation. Especially if you compare him to other middle aged men sex symbols of the 1980s like Tom Selleck, Harrison Ford, Richard Gere or Burt Reynolds.

The closest modern equivalent I can think of is Barney from How I Met Your Mother. Obviously, it's a bit different since we know Neil Patrick Harris is gay, but was he pushed as a sex symbol to women in the early days of How I Met Your Mother?

#42 FrancisRizzo3

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 07:41 PM

So, what was cut when JSC said you better not cut that out. Because there's a pretty obvious cut there.
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#43 tomspanks

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 07:45 PM

View Postgrudlian., on 05 January 2018 - 07:39 PM, said:

Are we arguing John Larroquette is not a good looking man? Or just not a sex symbol?


The latter.

#44 PollyDarton

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 08:51 PM

View Postgrudlian., on 05 January 2018 - 07:39 PM, said:

I'm not sure John Larroquette was ever really marketed as a sex symbol. Maybe I'm splitting hairs on the definition of sex symbol. Dan Fielding (and I think that's where this reputation truly comes from) had a lot of sex with a lot of different women. He was also portrayed as being desperate, getting turned down or slapped by disgusted women he approached, sleeping with blowup dolls and, I think, prostitutes on occasion. Not really sex symbol behavior or reputation. Especially if you compare him to other middle aged men sex symbols of the 1980s like Tom Selleck, Harrison Ford, Richard Gere or Burt Reynolds.

The closest modern equivalent I can think of is Barney from How I Met Your Mother. Obviously, it's a bit different since we know Neil Patrick Harris is gay, but was he pushed as a sex symbol to women in the early days of How I Met Your Mother?


Well... there's a difference between being sexy and being horny maybe? 80s Sitcoms have a great tradition of characters who were horny AF, and Dan Fielding is a great example. There was Sam Malone, Blanche Devereaux, Mona on Who's the Boss, David Leisure's character on Empty Nest... I'm sure there's more. Are these characters sex symbols or just lusty bastards? Does acting horny make you sexy?

#45 PollyDarton

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 09:02 PM

View Posttomspanks, on 05 January 2018 - 04:24 PM, said:

You'll have to take me along, bc I seem to have lost the map.

View PostThe_Triple_Lindy, on 05 January 2018 - 05:45 PM, said:

Genuine curiosity ... what would it take?


Laroquette is tall with boyish charms... he's a lovable scamp. He kind of looks like a teddy bear and he's likable.

View PostThe_Triple_Lindy, on 05 January 2018 - 06:01 PM, said:

Is he trying to do some kind of Kaufman-esque "the joke is on the audience" monologue, where he just gets off on how uncomfortable he makes the audience through how unfunny he's being?

That was ... weird, for sure.


It's such a strange and almost arrogant monologue. I wonder if he would have done that monologue if he had known it would be the only time he would ever be the host of SNL. You can tell, he - a man who is ultimately The Dexy's Midnight Runners of actors - takes this shit REALLY seriously.

#46 grudlian.

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Posted 05 January 2018 - 09:29 PM

View PostPollyDarton, on 05 January 2018 - 08:51 PM, said:


Well... there's a difference between being sexy and being horny maybe? 80s Sitcoms have a great tradition of characters who were horny AF, and Dan Fielding is a great example. There was Sam Malone, Blanche Devereaux, Mona on Who's the Boss, David Leisure's character on Empty Nest... I'm sure there's more. Are these characters sex symbols or just lusty bastards? Does acting horny make you sexy?

All this for sure.

John Larroquette is handsome. I read an interview with him from the last couple years and he seemed intelligent, erudite, very bookish and well read while still down to earth. Maybe if he weren't Dan Fielding he could have been?

To maybe make this a little more on topic: Why wouldn't Stuart Pankin just keep goobers on him at all times? Seems like the kind of thing you wouldn't leave up to chance if it's the only way to calm down an empath.

#47 EvRobert

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Posted 06 January 2018 - 10:03 AM

Circling back to this

View PostWil Dride, on 05 January 2018 - 05:56 AM, said:

Quick correction: Patricia Resnick was the writer of the film, and she retained the services of the psychic that served as technical advisor. She's not the psychic herself as Paul had stated.


Patricia Resnick wrote 9-to-5. The co-writer on this, Tom Schulman wrote Dead Poet's Society.

Tom Schulman sold the rights to Dead Poets Society on the SAME DAY he sold the rights to Second Sight.

#48 Cam Bert

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Posted 06 January 2018 - 04:09 PM

So they complained that Bobby McGee is a terrible name choice but the full name of John Larroquette's character is Wilbur Wills which I would argue is just as bad if not worse.
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#49 SeaSkunk

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Posted 06 January 2018 - 05:01 PM

View PostPollyDarton, on 05 January 2018 - 08:51 PM, said:


Well... there's a difference between being sexy and being horny maybe? 80s Sitcoms have a great tradition of characters who were horny AF, and Dan Fielding is a great example. There was Sam Malone, Blanche Devereaux, Mona on Who's the Boss, David Leisure's character on Empty Nest... I'm sure there's more. Are these characters sex symbols or just lusty bastards? Does acting horny make you sexy?


Also, sexy in the eighties seemed to involve men with a lot of body hair (Selleck, Hasselhoff) and Fielding seems like he fits that bill. I don't want to find hair everywhere in my house unless I have a dog or a cat, so it's a no for me.

#50 The Triple Lindy

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Posted 06 January 2018 - 07:21 PM

View Postgrudlian., on 05 January 2018 - 07:39 PM, said:

I'd argue he is attractive. The posted photo is pretty 1980s and that may not be appealing 30 years later. I'm sure middle aged women in the 1980s probably thought he was pretty good looking. Looking at a recent picture of him, I'd say he looks better now.

I'm not sure John Larroquette was ever really marketed as a sex symbol. Maybe I'm splitting hairs on the definition of sex symbol. Dan Fielding (and I think that's where this reputation truly comes from) had a lot of sex with a lot of different women. He was also portrayed as being desperate, getting turned down or slapped by disgusted women he approached, sleeping with blowup dolls and, I think, prostitutes on occasion. Not really sex symbol behavior or reputation. Especially if you compare him to other middle aged men sex symbols of the 1980s like Tom Selleck, Harrison Ford, Richard Gere or Burt Reynolds.

I picked that photo because he was at the height of things then. You're probably right that Dan Fielding was more hapless than I really remember.

View Postgrudlian., on 05 January 2018 - 09:29 PM, said:

To maybe make this a little more on topic: Why wouldn't Stuart Pankin just keep goobers on him at all times? Seems like the kind of thing you wouldn't leave up to chance if it's the only way to calm down an empath.

He does at one point have a totally open container of them that he spills during a car chase. Lidless tupperware seems an odd choice of Goober conveyance when there are ziplock bags in the world.

View PostPollyDarton, on 05 January 2018 - 09:02 PM, said:

It's such a strange and almost arrogant monologue. I wonder if he would have done that monologue if he had known it would be the only time he would ever be the host of SNL. You can tell, he - a man who is ultimately The Dexy's Midnight Runners of actors - takes this shit REALLY seriously.

Anyone who spends three months studying real-life psychics and comes up with the character of Bobby McGee clearly has no sense of humor about himself.

I can't tell if him correcting Don Pardo is supposed to be a joke. Because he mispronounces "show" right after.

#51 The Triple Lindy

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Posted 06 January 2018 - 07:25 PM

I kinda love Bess Armstrong in this movie. My So-Called Sister Elizabeth shouts more that most movie nuns I've ever seen.

#52 Cam Bert

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Posted 07 January 2018 - 04:16 AM

Am I also the only one wondering why Second Sight Investigations has a secretary? If we are to believe their answering machine message that starts the movie they know who is calling and what they want and instruct them to hang up. Yet they have a secretary who manages calls, because when Wills comes in he asks if there are any messages. Later we see her through the door on the phone as well. So either you know who is calling and don't need one or you don't and you do? Or is the system Bobby gets a hunch, writes it down, they decide which one to follow through on and then the secretary contacts the people they choose to help?
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#53 SeaSkunk

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Posted 07 January 2018 - 06:42 AM

View PostCam Bert, on 07 January 2018 - 04:16 AM, said:

Am I also the only one wondering why Second Sight Investigations has a secretary? If we are to believe their answering machine message that starts the movie they know who is calling and what they want and instruct them to hang up.


Maybe they've realized that people don't follow directions well and still leave messages? I was a little offended on her behalf with the way Bobby treated her clothes, even if she seemed to treat it the way you would a toddler.

Having a secretary that has to deal with wacky antics without batting an eye might be another Ghostbusters 'homage'.

View PostCam Bert, on 07 January 2018 - 04:16 AM, said:

Or is the system Bobby gets a hunch, writes it down, they decide which one to follow through on and then the secretary contacts the people they choose to help?


This would work too. They seem like they need an office manager but I have no idea how they afford one. Maybe she's in charge of Goober procurement, too.

#54 DrGonzo

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Posted 07 January 2018 - 06:54 AM

My biggest qualm with the plot (well, one of many) was when Dr. Preston Pickett (Ph.D.) refused to use "Bobby's gift to make a dishonest quick buck", but he was perfectly fine with using his "powers" for an extended period of time to solve fender-benders and other idiotic crimes, for a lousy 10% fee.
So I guess somehow having him tell them the lottery numbers and making them instantaneous millionaires (at no one's expense) was way worse then putting his life in danger chasing kidnappers, or strapping him to the hood of a car (why couldn't he give instructions from the back seat?!), or having him blow up buildings or kidnap an entire airplane and drive it through the streets of Boston...

#55 tomspanks

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Posted 07 January 2018 - 11:39 AM

In the episode, Jason and Jessica gave Paul a hard time because he danced with his mother at her second wedding, but compared to that time Paul tried to French kiss his mother, it's really not that bad.

#56 mugglematt

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Posted 07 January 2018 - 03:05 PM

View PostWhat's Its Mission?, on 05 January 2018 - 04:56 AM, said:

Jessica did an amazing job (once again), but I wished June watched this movie just to get her take on Bronson's wig.


Posted Image


I need to see her hat.

#57 Paul Tabachneck

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Posted 07 January 2018 - 06:36 PM

I just want to say that I thoroughly enjoyed this movie, on an '80s kid perspective. Was it bad and stupid? Absolutely. What it also was, though, was a bunch of people doing exactly the jobs they had been hired for, and doing them well. Bronson Pinchot: jogging along pews, pinballing around rooms full of people and committing 1000% to every bit. John Larroquette: pretty much just being Dan from Night Court, but in league with a psychic. Bess Armstrong: constantly in her moment. All of it didn't come together all that well, but people were trying.

That said, I want to talk about the take-off on the early Poltergeist scene where Larroquette and "Pankin's Wife" (played by Mad Men's Christine Estabrook) are having remote wars, her with the remote, he with Bobby McGee's rabbit-ear limbs. If she was betting on all the games based on McGee's projections, just like he was, wouldn't she want to watch the game, and not the ABC TGIF lineup?

#58 Cam Bert

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Posted 07 January 2018 - 06:58 PM

Can we talk about how the ending implies that having sex cured Bobby of his multiple weird neuroses? Seemingly throughout the movie Bobby McGee is in a very child like state of being. He does a "peepee" dance when he has to go to the bathroom, he likes to play games and tests, other than his frequent sexual assaults on women he seems generally ignorant of them and still chaste, and and an overall pureness of character when not in an alternate personality. I thought maybe wrongly that when he was struck by lightning that he stopped aging mentally or reverted mentally. However, at the end of the movie when he shows up with his new girlfriend he's wearing tight restrictive clothing which we were told render him unable to function earlier in the film. He also has cut his hair and is calm, focused, and seemingly in general more mature. Even Murray he mentions how Bobby is "shaping up a little different, a little better" in the past while. Preston is also not doting on him all the time, and is letting him be. Bobby still has his powers but is a new seemingly independent person. What is the only thing that has changed since the climax? He had sex. That's it. So he loses his virginity and then all of sudden he's a cool guy now? Gone are the loose clothes and hippie hair? Gone is Preston's constant need to lead him around by the hand and control him and his powers. It seems that if that had taken him to a prostitute or something sooner their business might have been more successful from the start.
My Howdy sense is tingling. Break out Google maps and my abacus...there's a C&O to be solved! And this time, it's personal...
(credit to Elektra and Cameron H)

#59 sycasey 2.0

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Posted 07 January 2018 - 07:06 PM

View PostThe_Triple_Lindy, on 06 January 2018 - 07:21 PM, said:

I picked that photo because he was at the height of things then. You're probably right that Dan Fielding was more hapless than I really remember.


I've probably seen almost every episode of Night Court in syndication at some time or another. I used to watch the reruns religiously after school.

There were many, many episode plots with Dan Fielding trying to get laid. At least 90% of them ended with him failing to achieve that goal. The joke was that all of the characters kind of hated him but tolerated him anyway.

#60 The Triple Lindy

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Posted 07 January 2018 - 07:24 PM

View PostCam Bert, on 07 January 2018 - 06:58 PM, said:

Can we talk about how the ending implies that having sex cured Bobby of his multiple weird neuroses? Seemingly throughout the movie Bobby McGee is in a very child like state of being. He does a "peepee" dance when he has to go to the bathroom, he likes to play games and tests, other than his frequent sexual assaults on women he seems generally ignorant of them and still chaste, and and an overall pureness of character when not in an alternate personality. I thought maybe wrongly that when he was struck by lightning that he stopped aging mentally or reverted mentally. However, at the end of the movie when he shows up with his new girlfriend he's wearing tight restrictive clothing which we were told render him unable to function earlier in the film. He also has cut his hair and is calm, focused, and seemingly in general more mature. Even Murray he mentions how Bobby is "shaping up a little different, a little better" in the past while. Preston is also not doting on him all the time, and is letting him be. Bobby still has his powers but is a new seemingly independent person. What is the only thing that has changed since the climax? He had sex. That's it. So he loses his virginity and then all of sudden he's a cool guy now? Gone are the loose clothes and hippie hair? Gone is Preston's constant need to lead him around by the hand and control him and his powers. It seems that if that had taken him to a prostitute or something sooner their business might have been more successful from the start.

They might have hesitated because they would've had no idea what would happen. When they went into the strip club, Bobby shorts out and has a psychic panic attack when he sees the naked women ... Preston has a line about how Bobby hasn't developed the sexual side of his nature, and they said he was overwhelmed by the energy. But that's a hell of a reaction to have.

If you're right, and he grows up and is cured of some debilitating tics by getting laid and getting that energy out and developing that side of himself, then it would seem that the effects are beneficial, but there was no way they would've known they would be. If they had taken him to a brothel, he could've just as easily burnt the place to the ground