Jump to content
SlidePocket

Episode 218.5 - Minisode 218.5

Recommended Posts

So I don't know if anyone saw Jason Mantzoukas' appearance on this week's episode of Legion, but I will report that his character does begin the episode by asking someone to hand over their baby.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
On 8/1/2019 at 6:59 PM, sycasey 2.0 said:

So I don't know if anyone saw Jason Mantzoukas' appearance on this week's episode of Legion, but I will report that his character does begin the episode by asking someone to hand over their baby.

Haha. I really need to catch up, I love Legion.

Share this post


Link to post
On 7/26/2019 at 1:00 PM, grudlian. said:

I think it sets a really bad precedent that being annoying will change the show in your favor.

If Paul had been open to it, that would be one thing. He was very clear about not wanting to do it. So, unless the bit gets bigger, let it go.

low key would love if it was really Michael Bay or Michael Bay takes credit for it. 

Share this post


Link to post
4 hours ago, Gregory&Winona said:

low key would love if it was really Michael Bay or Michael Bay takes credit for it. 

If the person is really Michael Bay, I'm down with them doing it. That would be awesome and could only get better if Michael Bay were the guest for the episode. 

Share this post


Link to post

Rik Mayall  was part of a punk-era wave of absurd/alternative comedy and he, along with Adrian Edmondson, starred or appeared in several popular British series written by Ben Elton (Young Ones, Filthy Rich and Catflap,  and Blackadder) as well as the popular series Bottom and The New Statesman. He worked closely with Jennifer Saunders (of Ab Fab fame), Dawn French, Alan Rickman, Nigel Planer, and Stephen Frye.  In most his roles he plays some combination of over-the-top manic and/or deeply pathetic and neurotic twit. The manic side comes across in Drop Dead Fred -- this probably helps explains his casting in the movie. I'm not sure if this style of comedy worked with a US audience, although casting him makes sense with a co-production with the UK in the early 90s when he was a mainstay of British alternative comedy. 

Mayall died in June of 2014.

Trivia:

-He was almost voice cast in the Lion King but the role went to Rowan Atkinson (star of Blackadder, best know in the US as Mr. Bean)

- He was cast as Peeves the poltergeist in Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, the scenes were shot but were cut.  I'm willing to bet that Drop Dead Fred explains why he was cast, possibly also why the role was cut.

 

   

Share this post


Link to post

Drop Dead Fred was our daughter's imaginary friend.  When she was a little over two years she came into our bedroom and said Drop Dead Fred was at the window and scaring her.  He kept coming and scaring her and we started to try very hard to understand who or what he was and get rid of him and get some sleep. He was a bear, we were told, and "nice during the day but scary at night."

I wrote a little story about our trials with Fred and a friend who is a screenwriter caught the thread, optioned the story, and with his partner created a whole new story -- I think they liked the idea of a little girl with an essentially masculine imaginary friend, and the title was great.  (We never knew where the phrase DDF came from).   Once my mother roped off the living room with its newly cleaned carpet when we came to visit with our toddlers - I think that inspired the dog poo scene, but the rest was all the screenwriters and, significantly, Rik Mayall. 

People seem to love or hate the movie.  We have friends who walked out, but then I keep meeting people who are bonkers about it - one who named her car DDF. I vote with team Mantzoukas and Raphael - Fred was an extension of Elizabeth's own consciousness and it took more than a little chaos to shake off the controlling forces (her mother et al.) that threatened to drown her.  

 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
1 hour ago, elizabeth livingston said:

Drop Dead Fred was our daughter's imaginary friend.  When she was a little over two years she came into our bedroom and said Drop Dead Fred was at the window and scaring her.  He kept coming and scaring her and we started to try very hard to understand who or what he was and get rid of him and get some sleep. He was a bear, we were told, and "nice during the day but scary at night."

I wrote a little story about our trials with Fred and a friend who is a screenwriter caught the thread, optioned the story, and with his partner created a whole new story -- I think they liked the idea of a little girl with an essentially masculine imaginary friend, and the title was great.  (We never knew where the phrase DDF came from).   Once my mother roped off the living room with its newly cleaned carpet when we came to visit with our toddlers - I think that inspired the dog poo scene, but the rest was all the screenwriters and, significantly, Rik Mayall. 

People seem to love or hate the movie.  We have friends who walked out, but then I keep meeting people who are bonkers about it - one who named her car DDF. I vote with team Mantzoukas and Raphael - Fred was an extension of Elizabeth's own consciousness and it took more than a little chaos to shake off the controlling forces (her mother et al.) that threatened to drown her.  

 

Amazing! Thank you for sharing this! 

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×