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Episode 72 - From Ed Wood to O.J.: Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski


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#1 July Diaz

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Posted 05 April 2016 - 11:27 PM

Screenwriters Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski have a terrific skill writing movies about real people in their films Ed Wood, Man on the Moon, and Big Eyes—not to mention The People vs. O.J.. They join Leonard this week to discuss how they went from writing Problem Child to biopics, adding their own life experience into their writing, and why their Robert Ripley & Marx Brothers projects never got made. Plus, they recommend some underrated films that have influenced them.
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#2 Kickpuncher

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Posted 07 April 2016 - 05:27 PM

In case anyone else was curious...


Quote

The pinscreen

Alexeieff is most famous for his invention of the pinscreen which he used to make about 6 short films.
The pinboard on which Alexeieff created his extraordinary black and white films is an upright perforated board, three by four feet, into which a million headless steel pins have been inserted. When the pins are pushed forward and lighted obliquely, they create an entirely black surface on the front of the Pinboard. When they are pushed back, the white of the board shows through. In between the pins create various shades of grey.[9]
The first prototype of the pinscreen was made by Alexandra Grinevsky with the help of her daughter Svetlana. It consisted of a canvas perforated with a grid into which pins were inserted. Later on Claire Parker and Alexeieff built the first large pinscreen which was used to film Night on Bald Mountain. The Parker family paid for the construction of it.
Alexeieff never made sketches before he created the images on the screen. He conceived each of the stages on the positive side of the screen while Claire worked on the back side of it. Small man made tools were used to produce various patterns on the board. Such everyday instruments as forks, spoons, knives, brushes, cups, prisms and rolling pins were used.
Each of the frames was created one at a time. This painstaking technique demands a lot of attention and ingenuity.
The only follower of Alexeieff, Jacques Drouin, of the Canadian Film Board has made several films using this technique.