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DannytheWall

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Everything posted by DannytheWall

  1. DannytheWall

    Raiders of the Lost Ark

    By the way, Indiana Jones missed running into Charlie Allnut and The African Queen by two years. TAQ takes place in 1914, and The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles, Season 1 ep 5, had Indy joining the Belgium army under false pretenses to fight in World War 1, and he was in the German East Africa campaign.
  2. DannytheWall

    Raiders of the Lost Ark

    I was all ready to jump on this question and outline my answer, but it's hard to put it succinctly into words. I certainly love the movie (although not to the extent of their guest on the episode) and if I could ever make a podcast that talked about just one thing it would probably be Indiana Jones. If I have to talk purely cinematically, I'll echo Cameron's point about it being very timeless, which to your specific callout of Fast and Furious somewhat fails But more to the point, there's a richness to the all the elements that really raise the movie to a level beyond superficial or fun. The cinematography, the lighting, the acting, the set design, the editing, stunts, the score, all of it is really top of the line and synergized. To be fair, there are certainly faults in the writing/plotting, but in light of its legacy to pulp heroes and old filmreels it stands out as a culmination of the genre. Overall, it's a perfect blend of fantasy and realism (formalism and expressionism) that just defines what a movie-going experience is. Like I said, hard to put it succinctly
  3. DannytheWall

    Raiders of the Lost Ark

    1. In my mind, Indy has always been close to Marion's age, since at the time they met he was a student of Abner Ravenwood. I can't put a number on his age at that time, but canonically Indy was always presented as doing things as a prodigy/younger than expected age. That doesn't necessarily excuse any "taking advantage" of course, and there was some acknowledgement by the characters that it was a Bad Idea. It fits the time period of the film and the tropes of the genre, but I admit it should make us call it out today. EDIT: I did have a pdf copy of a script attributed as a third draft, written by Lawrence Kasdan, 1979. So obviously not a shooting script. In it, it describes Marion as: "she is MARION RAVENWOOD, twenty-five years old, beautiful, if a bit hardlooking." Subtract from that Indy's quote when the Men from Washington ask him about Abner, her father, and he says "We haven’t spoken in ten years." And, yeah. Ew. No indication of Indy's age description. I'm sure there are ways to justify things character-wise, history-wise, or whatever, but still. Ew. 2. It's pretty clear that Marion chooses to wear the dress, so as to play into the trope in order to escape. Character-wise, she is using Belloq's ego against him, as he's expecting her to act like a helpless damsel when she's really not. (Something about the way men treat "objects" overall in the film?) So, yeah, the film doesn't quite subvert the trope entirely as Indy not only arrives to rescue her but re-ties her up to save the day somewhere else, but it does tweak and play with the idea enough to not be a textbook case.
  4. DannytheWall

    Raiders of the Lost Ark

    Yeah! It reminds me of a supercut I once saw that was titled something like "Every Spielberg character looking into light." Pretty much a signature auteur style. To side rail a bit to answer by other question, I think the oversaturated colors of many 60s-ish movies fall a bit into uncanny valley territory. It's not real enough to be really real and that's unsettling. Although that might be why Raiders works so well but Crystal Skull (among its MANY faults) falls flat -- the practical effects of Raiders makes it way more visceral of an experience than a CGI environment.
  5. DannytheWall

    Episode 199 - A Night In Heaven: LIVE!

    Wait, you're right!! Clearly, what happens is the teen witch from Beastly shows up, cursing him into a frog. Of course, he can't stop dancing, even though he's searching for true love's kiss. It's titled... The Princess and Michigan J. Frog
  6. DannytheWall

    Psycho

    Since we're talking about Hitch's oeuvre, I'll mention that I use a lot of Hitchcock in my Film classes. (I teach film for grade 11 and 12. Although I doubt I've ever used the word "oeuvre.") It's funny that the black and white films seem to go over so much better. Strangers on a Train will keep the students riveted from start to finish, but North by Northwest will have them shuffling and fidgeting in between the two big iconic scenes. The way Arbogast is killed and filmed falling down the stairs makes students laugh but they "forgive" it better than a similar and techinally more proficient effect in Vertigo. I wonder if it might have to do with the black and white allowing for a different experience than the hyper-saturated technicolor. There's a different way you have to engage your imagination when watching a B&W in my opinion. Would Psycho have been as compelling if it was in color?
  7. DannytheWall

    Psycho

    I don't see a general apathy towards Psycho compared to The Sixth Sense. That implies that everyone might prefer the latter film or be somehow dismissive of the former. Instead, I think there was much more contention about The Sixth Sense whereas most people generally agree about the place and praise for Psycho. Also, it's a much more thoroughly examined film, with countless opinions already given and gone over countless times. Heck, Psycho's has had literal do-overs of the entire film, where The Sixth Sense is reduced to a catchphrase. On my personal Letterboxd ranking, I went ahead and put Psycho above Citizen Kane. I wondered if a film would ever do that, and the way I'm making the Letterboxd list is one that relies on gut feeling right after I watched the film but before I listen to the podcast. Does it belong in the top half? Yep. In the top fourth? Yep. Above All About Eve? I guess so. And Citizen Kane? Wow. Actually, yeah. Who knew? But then Raiders came along and I have to put it on the top. I'm sure I'll have much to say about that one when the time comes. Edited to add: https://letterboxd.com/dannythewall/list/unspooled-afis-100/in case you'd like to look at my fevered mind
  8. DannytheWall

    Push (2009)

    Just finished watching this one and must resurrect this post to ABSOLUTLELY second this. Also, DO NOT watch this one right after The Darkest Minds.
  9. DannytheWall

    Episode 199 - A Night In Heaven: LIVE!

    A psychologist would have a field day with this movie. So many storytelling decisions point to some pretty deep subconscious fears, all 80s-flavoured. Fears of downsizing/job mobility in an 80s recession? Check. Fears of rampant militarization? Fears of redefining marriage and of non-traditional sexual awakenings? Check, check, check. All we needed was some anti-drug messages and some good old-fashioned gay panic and we'd have "80s Existential Fear Bingo!"
  10. DannytheWall

    The Lord Of The Rings: The Fellowship Of The Ring

    Listening to Brett Ineson the cgi specialist was a real treat. He shows how intensive the process can be and how truly groundbreaking some of this stuff was. I was a bit disappointed tho that not more was made of the actual *animation* of the character. Brett's credits include the motion edit department, which puts the capture to the model before animating, texturing, effects, etc. (as he explains in the podcast), so I realize my criticism has nothing to do with anything he says. I don't work in the field these days, but I'm hyper-sensitive to the issue, and I would love to advocate and raise awareness of the job of the animator. Too many people still think that motion capture is some kind of fancy effects makeup, but it's not simply a kind of drag and drop feature. The actor is the clearly the foundation for the performance, but it's more symbiotic than most people think (and that includes the actors who perform it!) I remember it being more of a brouhaha a few years ago: https://www.cartoonbrew.com/motion-capture/lord-of-the-rings-animation-supervisor-randall-william-cook-speaks-out-on-andy-serkis-99439.html
  11. DannytheWall

    Episode 198 - Look Who’s Talking Too: LIVE!

    Although I said that Roseanne wasn't an accomplished voice-over artist, this film wouldn't be Roseanne's only voice acting work. About the same time she must have been working on Look Who's Talking Too, Roseanne helped produce an animated children's cartoon called "Little Rosey." The main character was based on a semi-autobiographical version of her 8 year-old self, but it only lasted one season, before Roseanne could voice a character. A year later, a prime time special version of the cartoon *did* feature Roseanne's voice. The storyline of that, called The Rosey and Buddy Show, featured the main characters battling some meddling cartoon studio executives (in the form of weasels) that want to stop them from doing their tv show. Hmm. Years later, of course, it's 2004 with Walt Disney Animation's Home on the Range, where Roseanne voiced the lead role of a cow with plenty of opportunity for frequent udder jokes. It basically coincided with the shut down of the 2D animation unit at Disney for pretty much forever (with the attempts at only a couple of exceptions.) Ok, so maybe "accomplished" voice-over artist isn't the right term. PS-- Home on the Range should probably be on the recommendation list if it isn't already
  12. DannytheWall

    Cool World (1992)

    I was thinking about all kinds of animated features for HDTGM, but this live action/animation mix would top the entire list. Legitimately a train wreck that is equal parts fascinating and repellant. Good fodder for Jason's humor, but I doubt June would be on board. I can understand if we all must want to just forget this movie ever happened and maybe it will cease to exist accordingly.
  13. DannytheWall

    Episode 198 - Look Who’s Talking Too: LIVE!

    LOL you beat me to the footnote about the animated cartoon. (Although technically the Cab Calloway stuff is very much rotoscoped, which makes it look so different to the bouncey animation of the other characters.) The reason we all got so many VHS compilations of toons like these is due to some copyright issues that let a lot of these things slip into public domain or otherwise be adapted freely into the new medium of home video. Like the hosts said, the media budget got blown on all the big-name songs, so they had to throw in a free public domain Betty Boop for some reason.
  14. DannytheWall

    Episode 198 - Look Who’s Talking Too: LIVE!

    Does anyone know the approach the director/actors used to make this movie? Surely there can't be a shooting script with Bruce and Roseanne's lines typed out for them to read? I mean, I can only guess based on the looks of things, but it seems like they just shot a bunch of footage all at once, then edited it in some vague sense of through-line, and finally had the actors improv during a dubbing session. And they just went with the first take of the reading. Clearly, Look What's Talking Too is what happens when you get actors by name and not by reputation of improv comedy or voice-over. It also follows a general trend at the time if I remember right. A lot of comedies in the late 80s/early 90s found a successful formula relying on actors just free-forming it while cameras rolled, especially with actors like Robin Williams and Jim Carrey. Sketch comedy seemed to be a trend with a new generation of SNL, In Living Color, etc. I wonder if the rise of video and digital contributed, since you didn't have to restrain your actors because of pesky things like expensive film stock more and more. Then again, maybe my timeline is off, since it would take another 10 years or so for our technology to produce Baby Geniuses.
  15. DannytheWall

    Apocalypse Now

    I'm so glad someone mentioned this. It was my first experience with anything AN, and it was just too obtuse for me to make any sense out of. It spurred me on to look up the movie, actually. Along with other references the show made, specifically Jerry Lewis/The Day The Clown Cried, etc.
  16. DannytheWall

    Apocalypse Now

    I wrote "there sure seems to be a whole lot of sound and fury that ultimately signifies nothing..." which basically echoes Paul's observation in the podcast about it seeming more like one of a film student's first films. Then I remembered I thought about that for Sixth Sense, but for some reason I rate the latter higher. And then I read Origami's post above, too. My attempt at quippy phrase was not the best one to follow that. Thanks, Origami, for your personal reflection (and your service!) and that contributes way more than mine. I don't think we'll see eye to eye on this film, but it's certainly not a 'crime' to respond to film in such a personal and heartfelt way.
  17. DannytheWall

    E.T. The Extra Terrestrial

    ET hits more nostalgia buttons beyond just seeing the movie as a kid. The house's location was filmed very near my childhood home. Whenever we passed it or referred to the area it was as "Eliot's house." (Just watched High Noon which used Iverson Ranch which was also near my home. I can always recognize it immediately.) I was a Ride Operator for Universal Studios Hollywood during my college years. While my primary job was on the BTTF ride (and later, Jurassic Park) we had to be trained and we had to cover shifts for ET The Adventure as well. (Feel free to ask me anything!) I remember the ride was "unofficially" a sequel, of sorts, where you had to "help" ET get back to his home, the Green Planet, because "only his healing touch" could save it. So many questions and implications about the movie. LOL. The ride vehicles were these collections of bicycles on an overhead track so you could fly over the city and through hyperspace and stuff. There was another alien named, Botanicus, who was ET's mentor/teacher or something?, and he welcomed you to the Green Planet, with baby ETs and living plants that would dance and sing because their planet was saved. At the end, ET would greet you personally because you gave your name to a ride operator before the loading platform. And yes, bored or disillusioned employees might program "different" names to make ET say some "different" things. I'll always remember the specially-designed pine scent that was piped into the forest scene, making the whole ride smell pungent. It was either pleasant or nauseous depending on how long your shift and mandatory overtime was.
  18. DannytheWall

    High Noon

    Maybe there's more alternative endings: 1. The sitcom ending. Will Kane finishes off the final bad guy, the makes a quip with a pun on the word "high" or "noon," and the surrounding townspeople all have a hearty laugh. Credits. 2. The Twilight Zone ending. In the next town, where Kane and his wife are scheduled to arrive at noon, one of his enemies is raising a posse to wait his arrival. Dun dun dun! 3. It was all, say it with me, a Jacob's Ladder scenario.
  19. DannytheWall

    High Noon

    I laughed when I heard Paul's first reaction. It was literally the exact thing I said after the movie ended. "Well, that was... fine." So I guess that means my immediate response was that it was a bit better than "OK" but not high enough for "great." It almost felt like a TV movie or episode. But maybe that says more about how "cinematic" television has grown over the past 60-some years This was the first movie on the Unspooled list that I had never watched previously. I was excited to be able to experience fresh. Didn't know any of the context or backstory. I'm not a young viewer, but maybe my sensibilities are, as I grew a bit restless. Still, the pacing of the movie is notable as it fits the conceit-- this film is one long study in suspense. Very Chekhov/Hitchcockian in some senses. This really does set it apart, and might be why people call it a "Western for non-Western fans." If all things were equal and it didn't have this element, I feel the film wouldn't deserve such distinction. Edited to add-- I could really take or leave Will Kane. I don't know if it's because of Cooper or because of how familiar (cliche?) the archetype might be. But whenever the Helen Ramirez character appeared, I brightened up considerably. I found her fascinating. I wanted to know all about her, and would have enjoyed a movie about her story way more than Kane's, I think.
  20. DannytheWall

    E.T. The Extra Terrestrial

    LOL for the record I'm not advocating for another 15 minute sequence that begins with a tile "One Month Later" or whatever. Although it sounds like a note that might have existed from some junior executive at some point.
  21. DannytheWall

    Episode 197 - Beastly: LIVE!

    Well, Zouk was really working blue this episode. (or I mean brown?) Tee hee
  22. DannytheWall

    E.T. The Extra Terrestrial

    Henry Thomas also starred in my absolute-favorite-as-a-kid film, Cloak and Dagger. Which, talk about daddy issues... I don't disagree that there's a motif of "daddy issues" in Speilberg films, but I think there's still a lot of nuance to the approach. It's more like a hero's journey-kind of thing, where mentors either arrive, must pass on, or both, in order for the hero to pass through/overcome/etc. In ET's case, it's a coming-of-age drama that has trappings of sci fi and kid flicks.
  23. DannytheWall

    E.T. The Extra Terrestrial

    I remember seeing ET as a kid and being quite affected by his lifeless body in the storm drain. I also remember not "getting" it, like there was a lot going on that other people seemed to understand, but I was left just getting it on an emotional level. Maybe I was too young to see it? But that does elevate it beyond "just" a kids movie. There's a lot of stuff that doesn't get answered, or gets answered very late. For example, the audience can make inferences about Eliot/ET's empathy bond but it doesn't explicitly get stated by a character into well into the act three. It feels like something that would have been forced by executive notes if it were a simple kids' movie. Then again, some things I can't really answer, like ... why does this family own so many stuffed animals? do biology classes really cut out STILL BEATING HEARTS like the teacher says? why did the mom leave Gertie alone in the house to go pick up Eliot when he got in trouble? how did the mom and Dr Keys arrive at the farewell scene? why together? and with the dog? It might have been nice to have a few minutes of denouement. ET gets on the ship, and.... movie's over! Some sense of how Eliot is changed or the family is somehow better because of their shared experience would be appreciated.
  24. DannytheWall

    The Sixth Sense

    A couple other notes I took while re-watching: -- I still can't get over the bad exposition of the first scene. Please hold this up as a what-not-to-do for budding screenwriters. Ditto some other times at the school, when the boyfriend was moving furniture... hm. Actually a lot. -- One of the first "ghost" scenes was in the kitchen, a oner that followed the mom from one room to the next, switching from a steadicam to shakicam. Not an unsubtle trick but it still felt unsettling. The Blair Witch Project was also 1999 so maybe there was something in the air about supernatural = shakey cam -- Why didn't the mom never notice the ghosts in the photos in the hall before this? -- If the wife ever went to the basement, would she have seen dictionaries opening themselves and pens moving to write in notebooks? For a ghost that can't manipulate anything, there's a lot of object work. -- The subtitle for this movie was going to be "Bruce Willis sits down a lot." -- When are we going to get a Sixth Sense and Ghost teamup? Where HJO and Whoopi Goldberg have to team up with a little help from Patrick Swayze and Bruce Willis. -- Queer Theory time! Cole is an outsider who sees the world differently, is bullied and marginalized for not fitting in, and is redeemed by coming to terms with himself and coming out to his mother, after which the world is restored.
  25. DannytheWall

    The Sixth Sense

    I agree a lot with your take, and specifically this. It's because overall that opening scene is so forced and clunky. It's clear that the "real" movie the director/writer was interested in was the middle part and its famous twist, and anything to get there more quickly can be hamfisted in. I saw the movie several times in my early days, and as a budding young film aficionado, those "obvious" cinema techniques that Paul claimed were a bit hackneyed seemed so revelatory to me at the time. Like being in on the twist ending, I felt I was "in" on seeing the film-as-art at a more sophisticated level. Now, after seeing the film again for after like 20 years or so, these things seem so first-time-film-student. In particular, the opening dialogue and exposition was just so, uh, lifeless, and inorganic. That being said, I was still completely absorbed by the story and HJO's acting was sweet and sincere. That scene when he shares about the grandmother with his mom was still pretty emotional for me. The film isn't about the horror tropes or the twist ending, it's about connections and "communication" as the podcast talked about. Since I add the films to my Letterbox list one at a time right before I listen to the podcast, this one gets added about in the middle so far. As more films are discussed, I imagine it will filter down a bit, but as hackneyed as a lot of it is, it's still worth being on the 100 list. (An updated 2018/2020 list? Maybe not.)
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