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On paper, this movie sounds like it might be interesting: directed by Robert Altman, includes delightful actors such as Jane Curtin, Jon Cryer, Cynthia Nixon, and Paul Dooley, and even has cameos by Bob Uecker, Melvin van Peebles, Martin Mull, and Dennis Hopper.

 

However, this mess of a movie feels like a horrible failed attempt by Altman to deconstruct the 80's teen sex romp. With absolutely no story line, and odd hijinks for a teen comedy (like doing whatever it takes to see a King Sunny Ade concert. What!? What an obscure African musician for two suburban Arizona teens to party with!), this movie amounts to no more than a series of bizarre disjointed vignettes. There are some moments that feel like an 80's teen comedy...like Altman and the writers saw something similar in another movie once...but it's clear that they had no business working within this genre and really didn't know teens. There is no honesty, heart, or humor in this film.

 

I would love to hear a few baffled "bonker's" and "litterally's" uttered in response to this film. It really is a nightmare that should never have made it to theatres.

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However, this mess of a movie feels like a horrible failed attempt by Altman to deconstruct the 80's teen sex romp.

 

By all accounts, that WAS what he was trying to do. Or at least, satirize it.

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By all accounts, that WAS what he was trying to do. Or at least, satirize it.

 

Yeah, I read that, but it didn't seem to work as a satire. It just seems like a bad 80's teen movie. I couldn't see where he was critiquing the genre. He seemed to just play into what he thought a teen movie was sort of like.

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