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Cinco DeNio

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Posts posted by Cinco DeNio


  1. If people remember my comment during 1776 week, I wondered why soundtracks weren't released more often, especially for movies.  Now I understand why, and why my stance was wrong.

    Performances, especially theater, are snapshots in time.  The very nature of theater is ephemeral.  The point is that every night can be different because it's a brand new performance of a work.  The only way to capture a specific performance is to record it and recording is prohibitively expensive.

    As the Disney+ movie of Hamilton shows, even a recorded performance isn't a single performance.  They recorded four or more performances and had the cast come in for close-ups and pick-ups.  Any movie musical (like The Greatest Showman, for example) is combined of multiple takes so there still isn't one performance.  On top of that, movie performances are often different than the released soundtracks.  A stage musical like Les Miserables has a lot of interplay and filler that was left out of the soundtrack.  Listening to the CDs still doesn't give a full performance.

    Watching a movie is inferior to listening to CDs because CDs can be listened to while doing other things.  Watching a performance requires sitting in front of the screen and devoting a measure of attention to the performance.  Yes, you can do other things while watching but you miss things or the impact can be lessened.  Watching half-heartedly only works if you've seen the performance before.  I have listened to the Hamilton CD soundtrack often in my car and couldn't watch it.

    Lastly, listening to a CD allows one's imagination to play.  Like reading a book, a listener can fill their own picture of the characters, cast, scenery, etc.  Watching a performance or movie limits the user to a certain vision.

    Give me recorded soundtracks any day now.

    • Like 1

  2. On 9/29/2020 at 1:08 PM, GrahamS. said:

    I enjoyed it. I’m sure a lot of stuff was sanitized but it was entertaining.

    I watched it last night.  My big problem is James' being so sure he was right at every turn, especially when his bandmates complained about not having been paid.  He acted like they were being totally unreasonable when he was committing a breach of contract.  His seeing Bobby Bird at the end rang a little hollow but I liked the look on his face at the very end.  They skipped over "Living in America".  I was surprised at that.  That would have been a signature performance for Chadwick.

    • Like 1

  3. On 9/23/2020 at 6:44 PM, Cameron H. said:

    When all the Blockbusters were closing and they were selling all their stock, I picked this up on Blu-Ray for, like, a dollar or something. We watched maybe 15 minutes (when he goes to college I want to say) when my wife popped it out of the player, snapped it in half, and threw it away -- lol. So, no, I don't think you need to watch it.

    When I worked at Blockbuster I took a truck tire, dipped it in ink and rolled it over some paper. I sold the papers for $20 each as Optimus Prime autographs.

    • Like 1

  4. 1 hour ago, theworstbuddhist said:

    Haha, ok, I tried to give Gigi time to step in but she must be busy so I will go ahead with my pick, which was inspired by the recent Emmy wins for the wonderful Canadian sitcom Schitt's Creek. It's the fourth of the right honourable Lord Haden-Guest's mockumentary films, starring many of the same repertory cast as his previous and later ones, but this one is about the subculture of American folk music. It features the great Eugene Levy and Catherine O'Hara as Mitch and Mickey as well as Bob Balaban, Jane Lynch, Fred Willard, Parker Posey and many more. We're watching:

    mighty-wind-poster.jpg

    It should be available for rent in a variety of outlets as near as I can tell and it may be on Prime as well. Enjoy!

    Awesome! I love this movie. I can do Kast viewings for people later this week.

    • Like 3

  5. 8 hours ago, Cinco DeNio said:

    I forgot to mention I met Joan Jett once.  In 2000 they did a Broadway revival of The Rocky Horror Show and Joan played Columbia.  (She did a guitar solo during Time Warp and moved out too far so the cable came unplugged from the amp.)  After the show she came out to her car and signed autographs.  I was the last one and asked her how a Broadway opening was different from a concert.  She commented that she was used to having complete control when a concert was put on and she had to trust everyone else to do their jobs when she did Broadway.  She was very cool.

     

    • Like 1

  6. I forgot to mention I met Joan Jett once.  In 2000 they did a Broadway revival of The Rocky Horror Show and Joan played Columbia.  (She did a guitar solo during Time Warp and moved out too far so the cable came unplugged from the amp.)  After the show she came out to her car and signed autographs.  I was the last one and asked her how a Broadway opening was different from a concert.  She commented that she was used to having complete control when a concert was put on and she had to trust everyone else to do their jobs when she did Broadway.  She was very cool.

    • Like 2

  7. On 9/26/2020 at 12:24 AM, GrahamS. said:

    If you’re familiar with the play, I don’t know why you’d need to see the movie to enjoy the HDTGM show. I’m kinda waiting to see if it comes on HBO beforehand. But I saw the play in high school and from what I can remember it’s just 90-120 minutes of pure WTFery. No plot or anything (if you can’t guess, I’m with you, the play sucks).

    The advantage of them doing an online live show is that you can still see the visual references they’re making without having to sit through this legendary piece of shit.

     

    I'm happy to do a Kast show (or shows) for people.  I'll also do the 1999 filmed stage show if people want to see that.  (Just found someone posted the 1999 film to Dailymotion.)

    • Like 1

  8. 2 hours ago, Quasar Sniffer said:

    I love Rush, and I also love Joan Jett. It seems to make sense that the Runaways would have a chip on their shoulder, it was probably something Kim Fowley sort of ingrained in them. Make a scene with a big headliner that doesn't have much crossover with their fanbase for the publicity. He's a real fucking piece of shit. As for Ayn Rand (speaking of pieces of shit), I never understood how anyone in the arts can love her, but she certainly has her followers. 🤮 Peart is unassailable as a drummer though. 

    As for Japanese rock girl groups, there is this niche subgenre of Japanese women doing great power metal (nobody does cool niche stuff like Japan). Not the manufactured sort of thing Baby Metal did/is doing, but actual musicians writing and making music. The connection to The Runaways is tenuous at best, since the micro-genre owes more to Iron Maiden, Iced Earth, and, most prominently, Japan's own Galneryus, but because of the previous discussion, I though I would post an example. Here is the great Mary's Blood:
     

     

     

    There was a Neil Peart tribute concert on September 12th and there will be another this May.

    https://www.loudersound.com/news/neil-peart-tribute-concert-to-take-place-this-saturday

     

    • Like 1

  9. 13 hours ago, GrahamS. said:

    About halfway through it. Will finish it tonight and give more thoughts then. I will say I’m loving Michael Shannon’s performance—I pretty much always love his performances—but it did remind me of this:

    in other words, it was very Michael Shannon-y (another great underseen performance by him was on the HBO shor Room 104).

    That is a genius performance.  I also like him in Premium Rush.

    • Like 1
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