Jump to content

sycasey 2.0

Members
  • Content count

    1429
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    36

sycasey 2.0 last won the day on October 8

sycasey 2.0 had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

2258 Excellent

About sycasey 2.0

  • Rank
    Bling Bling
  • Birthday 08/18/1980

Recent Profile Visitors

3553 profile views
  1. sycasey 2.0

    Episode 253.5 - Minisode 253.5

    Oh wait, that was one using the original language that annoyed me. Branagh starred in it, but Oliver Parker directed and I found his decision to film it in a parade of extreme close-up shots very irritating. Also not really "HDTGM" bad though.
  2. sycasey 2.0

    Episode 253.5 - Minisode 253.5

    I'm with those who don't remember this version of Love's Labour's Lost being a particularly bad movie. I guess it's a weird concept and not really a great movie, but I wouldn't have considered it HDTGM material. Honestly, I didn't really consider any of these Shakespeare adaptations mentioned here especially bad, including the Mel Gibson or Ethan Hawke Hamlets. They all have their interesting elements. I guess I've never really hated any Shakespeare movie that used the original language.
  3. sycasey 2.0

    Eve's Bayou

    This one just didn't work for me. I'm actually a bit baffled by everyone praising the visual style, because to me it often felt like a Lifetime movie: flat, overlit interiors with little sense of mood or place. Most scenes are "talking heads," cutting from close-up to close-up, with the occasional showy device (a memory reflected in a mirror). Some aspects of the story are interesting (I like that the ending emphasizes ambiguity and unreliable memory), but I just can't see this as great filmmaking in any sense. I feel like I'm living on another planet from the people who praised this to high heaven, though I feel a bit vindicated by the fact that Lemmons' subsequent career hasn't been much to write home about. I'll also admit that I watched much of this while tired and distracted by a sick baby daughter, so I may not have been in the best mood.
  4. sycasey 2.0

    Eve's Bayou

    Paul & Amy use their second sight on 1997’s Creole family tragedy Eve’s Bayou! They learn why director Kasi Lemmons cut a mute observer character from the film, compare the story to To Kill A Mockingbird, and praise the film’s slippery relationship with truth and memory. Plus: A look at On Our Own, the Smollett family sitcom. This is the third episode in our Kinspooled series on “effed up families”; next week’s film is The Royal Tenenbaums! Learn more about the show at unspooledpod.com follow us on Twitter @unspooled and Instagram @unspooledpod, and don’t forget to rate, review & subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and Spotify. You can also listen to our Stitcher Premium game show Screen Test right now, and apply to be a contestant at unspooledpod@gmail.com! Photo credit: Kim Troxall
  5. sycasey 2.0

    Episode 253. Cats

    Not sure, but I think this means he's a Pokemon.
  6. sycasey 2.0

    Episode 253. Cats

    Oh yeah, that was driving me nuts. She doesn't even really look much like Cynthia Erivo.
  7. sycasey 2.0

    Episode 253. Cats

  8. sycasey 2.0

    Episode 253. Cats

    For those who missed the stream, they played this during the live episode: Release the butthole cut!
  9. sycasey 2.0

    Episode 253. Cats

    Part of it is that Tom Hooper is a terrible director for musicals. He doesn't get the stylistic needs at all. Everything about the Cats movie indicates that the director is striving for a kind of in-your-face realism. Yeah, that's right, for freakin' Cats! The way Hooper insists on recording the singing live on set, using CGI to make it all look like "real" fur, the way his hand-held camera is constantly moving and shaking around in medium and close-up shots of the actors . . . it's all a horrible way to do a musical that relies on big group dance numbers for its "wow" factor. I'm not sure that ALW musicals translate well to the screen anyway, but Hooper makes the wrong choices whenever possible.
  10. sycasey 2.0

    Episode 253. Cats

    There was a lot of confusion about what Cats is supposed to be about, but per the great theater director Harold Prince, Andrew Lloyd Webber already told us what it's about. It's about cats.
  11. sycasey 2.0

    Tokyo Story

    This was the first time I'd ever watched an Ozu film, and I feel like I went through this journey in real time throughout the movie. Found it a bit stilted and slow at first, but as it went along I became more engrossed and was won over. The filmmaking style (described as "too Japanese" for Western audiences at times) reminded me of a passage in Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics, where he lays out the differences in storytelling between Eastern and Western comic artists. http://bilalhafeez.com/the-comic-difference-between-western-and-eastern-mindsets/? Japanese comics tend to devote more time to setting the scene or creating mood and aren't in as much of a rush to get to something "happening." American/European comics tend to focus a lot more on action, and on what will happen next. I saw similar things in Ozu. He lingers so much more on exterior shots of buildings, trains, power lines, drying laundry, etc., than you would ordinarily see in an American film (even a slower, more esoteric kind of American film). It can make you restless at first, but this way of shifting your focus to what is not happening over what is happening builds up over time.
  12. sycasey 2.0

    Tokyo Story

    Just gonna post the artwork for this one too:
  13. sycasey 2.0

    Raising Arizona

    I would also argue that Lebowski does strike some emotional notes during Donnie's death and subsequent funeral scene.
  14. sycasey 2.0

    Raising Arizona

    I basically agree with this. I see all of its virtues, and I think there's something to be said for it as the first movie that truly crystallizes what people recognize as the "Coen style." But there are several Coen comedies I enjoy more. It's a purely subjective thing.
  15. sycasey 2.0

    Raising Arizona

    Paul & Amy raise up 1987’s Coen Brothers kidnapping caper Raising Arizona! They track the secret references to other Coen projects, learn why they thought of a baby as an “emotional squib,” and ask why Hi and Ed are so lovable despite committing an awful crime. Plus: discovering Nic Cage’s thoughts on babies. This is the first episode in our Kinspooled series on “effed up families”; next week’s film is Tokyo Story! Learn more about the show at unspooledpod.com follow us on Twitter @unspooled and Instagram @unspooledpod, and don’t forget to rate, review & subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and Spotify. You can also apply to be a guest on our upcoming game show Screen Test at unspooledpod@gmail.com! Photo credit: Kim Troxall
×