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sycasey 2.0

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sycasey 2.0 last won the day on August 6

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About sycasey 2.0

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  • Birthday 08/18/1980

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  1. sycasey 2.0

    Cooley High

    I was actually a little annoyed at how much the hosts kept comparing it to American Graffiti and claiming it was so much better, when I thought it was (1) very similar structurally (the major differences are of setting and cultural milieu) and (2) not as well-made technically. It also seemed a bit odd to be baffled that critics at the time called it another version of Graffiti, chalking such descriptions up to centering white experience and general racism. I'm sure that happened too, but . . . American Graffiti came out two years before this movie! It was a big hit and most people were familiar with it. Of course those comparisons were going to happen. I enjoyed this movie and thought the ending was unexpectedly poignant, but I also didn't quite find it worthy of the space capsule. As compared to other movies of its type (and of the time), Cooley High definitely has advantages in on-screen POC representation and social consciousness, but I'm not sure that's enough to make it clearly more worthy than the other movies you mentioned here.
  2. sycasey 2.0

    Cooley High

    Classic Paul.
  3. sycasey 2.0

    Cooley High

    Paul & Amy pour one out for 1975’s comic high school drama Cooley High! They learn how the film scored a soundtrack of wall-to-wall Motown hits, analyze the film’s take on teenage hijinks, and praise Michael Schultz as one of the great underrated directors. Plus: Glynn Turman (“Preach”) talks about the impact Cooley High had on his career. This is the fifth episode of our “Back To School” miniseries; next week’s film is Fast Times At Ridgemont High! Learn more about the show at unspooledpod.com, follow us on Twitter @unspooled and Instagram @unspooledpod, and don’t forget to rate, review & subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and Spotify. Also check out our live Spool Party episodes on youtube.com/earwolf, and apply to be a guest on Screen Test at unspooledpod@gmail.com!
  4. sycasey 2.0

    Rebel Without A Cause

    I voted yes based on this film's iconography being so strong and also it addressing some surprisingly pertinent issue (even to the modern day) despite how dated the melodramatic style is. I think you do have to perform a little bit of a mental adjustment for the time it was made to really appreciate it, which can be a mark against a film being preserved for all time. Dean is obviously the most memorable character and image from this movie, but IMO Sal Mineo gives the best performance. I guess Amy doesn't like Natalie Wood, but I think she's pretty good in this too.
  5. sycasey 2.0

    Rebel Without A Cause

    Amy & Paul are torn apart by 1955’s landmark teen drama Rebel Without A Cause! They celebrate the instantly iconic performance of James Dean, learn about the wild backstory of director Nicholas Ray, and take a close look at the seismic generational shifts of the era. Plus: reflections on the recent passing of Chadwick Boseman. This is the fourth episode of our “Back To School” miniseries; next week’s film is Cooley High! Learn more about the show at unspooledpod.com, follow us on Twitter @unspooled and Instagram @unspooledpod, and don’t forget to rate, review & subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and Spotify. Also check out our live Spool Party episodes on youtube.com/earwolf, and apply to be a guest on Screen Test at unspooledpod@gmail.com!
  6. sycasey 2.0

    The 400 Blows

    To me the brilliance of this film is that it is showing you all sides at once: the kid is at once a sympathetic little scamp and also an irresponsible brat. The filmmaking approach matches this too: for example, the final sequence of him running around in desolate spaces while romantic music plays over the soundtrack. Happy and sad all at the same time. It's a really interesting and nuanced remembrance of Truffaut's own youth.
  7. sycasey 2.0

    The 400 Blows

    Paul & Amy raise hell for 1959’s French New Wave adolescent drama The 400 Blows! They learn how François Truffaut went from a Hitchcock-worshipping critic to a director himself, discuss how he then became a major influence on directors like Steven Spielberg, and praise the value of creative limitations in creating truly fresh works of art. Plus: a scene from the unforgettable Sesame Street adaptation. This is the third episode of our “Back To School” miniseries; next week’s film is Rebel Without A Cause! Learn more about the show at unspooledpod.com, follow us on Twitter @unspooled and Instagram @unspooledpod, and don’t forget to rate, review & subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and Spotify. Also check out our live Spool Party episodes on youtube.com/earwolf!
  8. sycasey 2.0

    Stand and Deliver

    As with Mean Girls: it's a good film, not good enough to put in the space capsule. Olmos is great, but the rest of the movie is a fairly surface-level treatment of the subject. Not badly done or anything, and it does avoid over-dramatizing for the most part, but I'm not sure it's bringing anything extra except for the central performance. As with many here, I remember being shown this in school. My incomplete childhood memory was that we had watched a movie about a Japanese guy who taught a bunch of teens in L.A. to do math. I guess I assumed the lead character was Japanese because they called him "Kemo?"
  9. sycasey 2.0

    Stand and Deliver

    Amy & Paul stand for 1988’s rousing math class drama Stand And Deliver! They ask if this is the first major ‘indie’ film, learn how Edward James Olmos crafted his commanding performance as Jaime Escalante, and investigate whether the real students depicted cheated on their exam. Plus: Lou Diamond Phillips explains how he got cast as Angel, and why poker requires top-notch math skills. This is the second episode of our “Back To School” miniseries; next week’s film is The 400 Blows! Learn more about the show at unspooledpod.com, follow us on Twitter @unspooled and Instagram @unspooledpod, and don’t forget to rate, review & subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher and Spotify. Also check out our live Spool Party episodes on youtube.com/earwolf!
  10. sycasey 2.0

    Mean Girls

    It's a "no" vote from me, but that shouldn't be confused with a dislike of the movie. I like it very much. I'm just not sure it's one that needs to be preserved for all time in the space capsule. I agree with a lot of the praiseworthy elements talked about in the episode: the jokes are very sharp, the lead actresses are all great, it's very memeable and rewatchable. I think the thing that keeps it from "all-time classic" status for me is that it's also a bit didactic and literal in its delivery of themes. It's a script that has characters explain directly to the audience what the movie is about (at one point it's Fey herself doing it). Yes, that's all done with amusing jokes, so it's not a big drag or anything, but I think there are better ways to allow the audience to receive the same messages strictly through the drama and not have to explain it within the text.
  11. sycasey 2.0

    Musical Mondays Week 98 Stop Making Sense

    Anyway, I obviously haven't seen everything, but thus far I think this is the best concert film ever made.
  12. sycasey 2.0

    Musical Mondays Week 98 Stop Making Sense

    The movie Byrne directed, True Stories, definitely shares a lot of sensibility with Lynch and Anderson.
  13. sycasey 2.0

    Episode #245 - Money Plane

    I want to go back through that first Kelsey Grammer scene and count how many times he calls Edge's character "Jack." Has to be upwards of a dozen. Did Andrew Lawrence think we might forget the lead character's name? Or that his first name even matters when it's as generic an action-hero name as "Jack Reese?" (In fact, Jack is easily THE most common movie character name.) Mysteries abound!
  14. sycasey 2.0

    Coming of Age #BackToUnspooled

    Oh, for me personally Rushmore remains his best, but I don't see it showing up on other people's best-of lists as often as those others I mentioned.
  15. It's also important to note that Rotten Tomatoes is not measuring which films people HATED the most, just which films had the highest percentage of critics giving them at least a mildly negative review. Some of these are probably just widely acknowledged as dull or mediocre, not necessarily hated.
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