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sycasey 2.0

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sycasey 2.0 last won the day on October 2

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About sycasey 2.0

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  • Birthday 08/18/1980

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  1. sycasey 2.0

    The Best Years Of Our Lives

    I wondered about that too. Seems like they're going for dramatic irony here, where the wealthier man is lower-ranked than the working-class guy, and they find their status reversed in civilian society. Just speculating here, but I wonder if things were different during the WW2 era with so many people needed for the war effort? Perhaps it was easier to get promoted even without a degree.
  2. sycasey 2.0

    The Best Years Of Our Lives

    I noted in the Deer Hunter thread that Hal Ashby's Coming Home is probably the other great example, but I think Best Years of Our Lives is better.
  3. sycasey 2.0

    The Best Years Of Our Lives

    How many folks had seen this before? I had vague memories of seeing it as a kid, but the only thing I recalled was the guy with hooks for hands.
  4. sycasey 2.0

    The Best Years Of Our Lives

    Well, I absolutely loved it and did not expect to. Though because of the pure number of minutes to cover, I did have to split my viewing over two nights, it didn't "feel" like a long movie and I was engaged with all of the character stories throughout. I really liked how it lacked heroes and villains and gave focus to the wives and daughters along with the soldiers themselves. The typical Hollywood love triangle has a refreshing feel when people aren't sneaking around lying to each other and mostly just come out and say how they feel. I would also disagree about the filmmaking. It's not flashy, but there are a number of interesting compositions using deep focus, where there is action in the foreground but your eye can drift to something in the background (like the scene where Homer is playing the piano with his hooks, but Fred is in the back breaking up with Peggy). Oh, who's the cinematographer? Gregg Toland, natch. Anyway, it's interesting that most of the criticism at the time was for this film being too communist-sympathizing. I note that most of the movies from the 1940s on this list carry similar slants: It's a Wonderful Life, The Grapes of Wrath, even Citizen Kane in parts . . . all take a pretty dim view of capitalism and private enterprise and in most cases call for a collectivist solution to those problems. You can really see that's where the country's mood was after the Great Depression and WW2 (and perhaps we're returning there again?).
  5. sycasey 2.0

    The Best Years Of Our Lives

    We need a poll! Should this movie stay on the list?
  6. sycasey 2.0

    The Lighthouse (2019)

    Yes, it's possible this could improve upon second viewing. Mulholland Dr. was like that for me (to invoke Lynch as Eggers seems to want to).
  7. sycasey 2.0

    Forrest Gump

    Sometimes. The feather is the clearest example. But as I note, I don't think the movie is consistent about it like the Coen Bros are.
  8. sycasey 2.0

    Forrest Gump

    I think that also doesn't quite track. Most Army recruits are not college grads.
  9. sycasey 2.0

    Forrest Gump

    I guess . . . except it wasn't fate? Forrest signed up for the Army. This is what I mean about the message being muddled in the particulars.
  10. sycasey 2.0

    Episode 226 - Body of Evidence: LIVE!

    (Duplicate post.)
  11. sycasey 2.0

    Episode 226 - Body of Evidence: LIVE!

    This all gets to the thing that most bugs me about this movie: the sex scenes between Madonna and Dafoe serve no narrative purpose whatsoever. No one else really catches them, and the only person who has an inkling that it's going on (Julianne Moore) seems to instantly dismiss it and forgive him. There's no threat of Dafoe being disbarred or removed from the case. Madonna doesn't need to convince Dafoe to help her, because he's already interested in taking the case. She never tries to kill him or threaten him or anything. Their sexual relationship never comes up in court or affects the case at all. So basically the sex scenes are there just so the movie has sex scenes. That's why this seems like a porno.
  12. sycasey 2.0

    The Lighthouse (2019)

    I was kind of vaguely unsatisfied with how the movie ended. It's hard to put my finger on it, but I guess I hoped it would go somewhere more interesting or unexpected, but then it was pretty much a . . . It was definitely well-made and well-acted. I also think Willem Dafoe's inspiration was clear:
  13. sycasey 2.0

    Forrest Gump

    While the perception of women as much "older" than their male counterparts despite being the same age is an ongoing problem, in these cases I think it's justified enough to cast a younger actress to play the part, as they also have to play the same character as a young mother raising a younger child in the early scenes, and then they are aged up with makeup later in the movie.
  14. sycasey 2.0

    Forrest Gump

    I mean, kind of yeah? Or I'll put it another way: if a movie isn't saying anything, then in my judgment it's lacking. The best films have something to say. Yes, even seemingly light entertainments like Star Wars. Now, it's entirely possible the movie doesn't intend to say anything about historical events and is instead a commentary on something else, but whatever else I can think of seems kind of muddled and inconsistent to me. Like the "floating like a feather" idea. It's nice, but do the events of the movie actually support it? There are several occasions where Forrest makes active choices: disobeying Lt. Dan and going back to save people, buying the shrimp boat, running across the country, etc., that result in further fame and fortune for him. He didn't completely float through life. So what is the movie saying here? If he truly did float through and got by on pure luck, that might amount to a consistent statement about life or humanity, but the movie keeps hedging its bets.
  15. sycasey 2.0

    Forrest Gump

    Yeah, that's why I say "a lot" of his work, but not everything. Back To the Future definitely has a lot of heart. Over the years I do notice an increasing focus on technical wizardry over anything else, though.
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