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Cameron H.

Musical Mondays Off-Week 6 (Quasar Sniffer's Pick)

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I expect her to draw us all like one of her French girls.

But I don't own any French girls.

 

Got a cat tho

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But I don't own any French girls.

 

Got a cat tho

2yn5e80.jpg

 

That cat's gloating like its got a roguish mouse frozen in carbonite in the corner.

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Wow, I'm just happy and relieved I picked something that so many are both anticipating watching and haven't seen. I look forward to experiencing the decadent Weimar Republic through song with all of you!

 

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omg are we sharing our "i want you to draw me like one of your french girls" cat photos?!

 

cause

 

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Sorry, y'all. I'm allergic to cats, so all I've got is a lazy strumpet of a beagle.

 

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"Cat in a tub" is a fun phrase to say quickly.

 

And loudly.

 

And with a melody behind it.

 

Guys, I'm just scream-singing the phrase "cat in a tub" to my dog. Everything's okay.

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I wish I could have a pet but my apartment building doesn't allow them...

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"Cat in a tub" is a fun phrase to say quickly.

 

And loudly.

 

And with a melody behind it.

 

Guys, I'm just scream-singing the phrase "cat in a tub" to my dog. Everything's okay.

 

To Beethoven's 5th? Because, yes, that is fun.

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Speaking of cats. It was nice to see their Prince in Cabaret!

 

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Speaking of cats. It was nice to see their Prince in Cabaret!

 

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Shakespeare talk! Now you're on my wavelength!

 

When do we start ShakespeareFilm Sundays?

 

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ETA: Entirely irrelevant, but Michael York in Zeffirelli's Romeo and Juliet has this additional line that's kind of jammed in to the script, that has nothing to do with R+J, one of several such interpolations. He says "now, hie thee home, fragment" to Benvolio during the duel, which is more likely a quotation from Coriolanus. It's not the only such addition: at one point, Pat Heywood, who plays the nurse, calls Mercutio a 'punk rampant', from an obscure John Marston play. Fuck it, I'm just going to quote from my article on it (the quoting Shakespeare in film chapter I keep referring to)...

 

And while Franco Zeffirelli’s Romeo and Juliet (1968) featured a number of improvised and jarringly modern phrases (such as ‘baby’s dropped his sword’ and ‘cut his hair’) in its fight scenes, it also incorporated more Shakespearean-sounding threats. Tybalt tells Benvolio “Hie thee home, fragment,” which strongly suggests Coriolanus (“Go get you home, you fragments”). The Nurse calls Mercutio a “punk rampant,” an epithet with no precedent in Shakespeare, but twice used as a term of derision in Marston’s The Dutch Courtesan (1605).

 

Michael York (Tybalt) and Pat Heywood (Nurse) are both classically trained performers, so it is possible actors suggested the interpolations. Heywood worked extensively with the National Theatre in the 1960s, who produced The Dutch Courtesan at the 1964 Chichester Festival. Heywood was not a member of that Chichester company, but John Stride (Zeffirelli’s Romeo at the Old Vic in 1960) played Young Freevill, who speaks the phrase “Go, y’are grown a punk rampant.”

 

Seriously dudes, I have a Shakespeare contact high right now.

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When do we start ShakespeareFilm Sundays?

 

 

You know I'd be down!

 

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I just bought Zeffirelli's Taming of the Shrew this morning...

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When do we start ShakespeareFilm Sundays?

As long as I don't have to rewatch Whedon's "Much Ado About Nothing" or the "Romeo & Juliet" with Hailee Steinfeld I'm in. The further away I get from having seen those movies the more I dislike them... although I hated that version of Romeo & Juliet pretty immediately...

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I just bought Zeffirelli's Taming of the Shrew this morning...

 

The second best film adaptation of that play!

 

 

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The second best film adaptation of that play!

 

 

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I already own 10 Things...;)

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As long as I don't have to rewatch Whedon's "Much Ado About Nothing" or the "Romeo & Juliet" with Hailee Steinfeld I'm in. The further away I get from having seen those movies the more I dislike them... although I hated that version of Romeo & Juliet pretty immediately...

YESSSSSSSSSS Taylor I love you.

 

Those are perhaps my two least favourite versions as well - I have an article in process about the awful butchery that Julian Fellowes did on the most recent Romeo and Juliet, in his awful treatment of the script. I also have another one that I abandoned long ago about how problematic it is to show Benedick doing the walk of shame from Beatrice as a prologue to Whedon's 'Much Ado', and what the issue of sexual consummation does to the narrative.

 

Might be time to revisit those projects, maybe... Here's the beginning of the Much Ado one.

 

“A Consummation Devoutly to be Wish’d”: Fill(m)ing the Empty Space of Shakespearean Coital Beds

INT. APARTMENT BEDROOM – MORNING
We see the classic day-after tableau: there’s been a party, there’s been a more private party. BEATRICE lies in bed as BENEDICK quietly dresses. Neither of them says anything. He approaches her and she fakes sleep. He hesitates, then grabs his tie and exits.
EXT. STREET – DAY
It is a beautiful, sun-dappled street, lined with enormous old trees.
TITLE:
MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING.

The opening scene to Joss Whedon’s popular 2012 film adaptation of
Much Ado About Nothing
speaks volumes, despite the silence that pervades the 30-second clip. The relationship between Beatrice and Benedick, which provides the comic frisson to underpin the less-memorable love story between Hero and Claudio, is predicated on a past interaction, and Whedon leaves little room for misinterpretation on what that might have been. After Beatrice has humiliated the masked Benedick at the masked ball of the play’s second act, Don Pedro of Messina notes that the ‘merry war’ between the two has taken a turn: “Come Lady, come, you have lost the heart of Signior Benedick!” Beatrice’s response offers hints as to what that past interaction might have been: “Indeed, my lord, he lent it me a while, and I gave him use for it: a double heart for a single one. Marry, once before he won it of me with false dice, therefore your grace may well say I have lost it.” (TLN 677-81) The content of the “false dice” and the “loan” are no further illustrated by Shakespeare, yet they are memorably contemporised in Whedon’s film adaptation, where Beatrice’s words are innocently made bawdy to describe the before- and after-effects of the “walk of shame”. Whedon removes any question as to whether or not Beatrice and Benedick have consummated their relationship, and offers a definitive, relatable perspective on the reason for the tension between the two. What makes this gesture particularly significant? The role of sexual display, voyeurism, and the lascivious gaze in Shakespearean adaptation has been extensively glossed elsewhere, most notably in Richard Burt’s influential “Unspeakable ShaXXXspeares” and its analysis of pornographic Shakespeare in the context of American popular culture.

 

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When do we start ShakespeareFilm Sundays?

Could we pick interpretations of Shakespeare like West Side Story, Forbidden Planet or Throne of Blood?

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Could we pick interpretations of Shakespeare like West Side Story, Forbidden Planet or Throne of Blood?

 

I would be cool with that.

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I have an article in process about the awful butchery that Julian Fellowes did on the most recent Romeo and Juliet, in his awful treatment of the script.

The whole thing seemed to play more like a comedy than a tragedy. I remember every time Damian Lewis had a reaction to anything the whole theater would bust out laughing... which is probably not the reaction you want to what is considered one of the greatest tragedies of all time.

 

Although when he started mimicking Juliet that was hilarious and brilliant and kinda did shine a light on to how childish they were being.

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The whole thing seemed to play more like a comedy than a tragedy. I remember every time Damian Lewis had a reaction to anything the whole theater would bust out laughing... which is probably not the reaction you want to what is considered one of the greatest tragedies of all time.

 

Although when he started mimicking Juliet that was hilarious and brilliant and kinda did shine a light on to how childish they were being.

Serious question: did Damian Lewis channel his experience as Mr. Grey when playing Capulet? I vote yes.

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The whole thing seemed to play more like a comedy than a tragedy. I remember every time Damian Lewis had a reaction to anything the whole theater would bust out laughing... which is probably not the reaction you want to what is considered one of the greatest tragedies of all time.

 

Although when he started mimicking Juliet that was hilarious and brilliant and kinda did shine a light on to how childish they were being.

I have never heard of this version of the film until now. What part did Damian Lewis play?

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I have never heard of this version of the film until now. What part did Damian Lewis play?

Capulet. Seriously, I would be happier recommending you watch Tromeo and Juliet rather than this one. Compare trailers and tell me you disagree. First, Carlo Carlei's version:

 

 

HASHTAG FORBIDDEN LOVE

 

Now, the far superior Tromeo...

 

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(I'm mostly joking about 'far superior', Tromeo is 99% horrifying but at least it knows what it is.)

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